N3352

N3352
N3352 Family Interview Plan Page 2 of 3 Family Interview Plan In the space below, document the date of your scheduled interview to performed a Family Assessment. 1. First, schedule an interview with the chosen family (This cannot be your family. Use any resources from Weeks 2 to 5 to help you) 2. Record the date and time of the scheduled interview Date: Time: 3. In two to three sentences answer the following questions: a. Explain the types of things you will look for in the family. b. Provide a detailed plan with three areas of family assessment you will perform. 1. 2. 3. c. What resources do you plan to use to complete the Family Assessment? d. What will be your greatest challenge in performing this interview? N3352 Family Interview Plan Page 3 of 3 Rubric NOTE: All assignments must be submitted on time. Assignments submitted after the deadline will be accepted up to 48 hours with 5 late points off per day. Assignments will receive a grade of zero after 48 hours. Use this rubric to guide your work on the Module 1 Family Interview Plan. Tasks Target Acceptable Unacceptable Family Interview Plan (max 75 points) Schedule and prepare an interview with a family who is not your relative. The date of your scheduled interview listed (25 – 24 points) Schedule an interview with a family who is not your relative. The date of your scheduled interview is vague or too general (23-6 points) No interview scheduled. No date of your scheduled interview listed (0-5 points) Detailed plan with at least three areas of family assessment to be performed (50- 49 points) Outline of plan using two areas family assessment to discuss (48– 10 points) General family using one or zero areas of family assessment to discuss (0 – 9 points) Interview Information (max 25 points) Described resources used and what was the greatest challenge. (25-24 points) Resources and greatest learning information partial or insufficient (23-6 points) Minimal or missing information (0-5 point)

Assignment Module 1: Family Interview Plan Name: Date: Overview: Family Interview Plan The major assignment for this course is an interview of a Family and an assessment of Family characteristics which is due in Module 5/Week 5. You must schedule an interview to perform a family assessment during Module 1/Week 1. This interview will gather information for all of the weekly assignments. This family cannot be yours. You may use any resources from week two through five. The Friedman Family Assessment Short Form will be very helpful to create your interview. Please schedule an interview to perform a family assessment during Module 1/Week 1. It is strongly recommended that you conduct this interview by Module 2/week 2. This does not need to be face to face. Complete this assignment to describe which family you plan to interview and reflect on the interview by answering the questions below. Post the date you have scheduled the interview with the family. Objectives ? Explain how nurses begin family assessment from the moment of contact. ? Compare and contrast characteristics of families. ? Apply trends, issues, theories, and evidence as guidelines for family assessment.

Module 1-Assignment 1: Family Interview Plan Due Saturday by 11:59pm Points 100 Submitting a file upload Open the assignment N3352 Module 1 Assignment 1 Family Interview Plan.docx Download N3352 Module 1 Assignment 1 Family Interview Plan.docxfor details. Family Interview Plan The major assignment for this course is an interview of a Family and an assessment of Family characteristics which is due in Module 5/Week 5. You must schedule an interview to perform a family assessment during Module 1/Week 1. This interview will gather information for all of the weekly assignments. This family cannot be yours. You may use any resources from week two through five. The Friedman Family Assessment Short Form will be very helpful to create your interview. Please schedule an interview to perform a family assessment during Module 1/Week 1. It is strongly recommended that you conduct this interview by Module 2/week 2. This does not need to be face to face. In two to three sentences answer the following questions: Explain the types of things you will look for in the family. Provide a detailed plan with three areas of family assessment you will perform. What resources do you plan to use to complete the Family Assessment? What will be your greatest challenge in performing this interview? Complete and submit your assignment by 2359 Saturday of Module 1. Attachments N3352 Module 1 Assignment 1 Family Interview Plan-1.docx Download N3352 Module 1 Assignment 1 Family Interview Plan-1.docx Friedman Family Assessment form Download Friedman Family Assessment form Minimize File Preview You can see both attachments are needed. assignment-1-family-interview-plan-12mf.docx and The Friedman Family Assessment Form. So why can I not get both? please help me understand the instruction for my assignment??

Due Saturday by 11:59pmPoints 100Submitting a file uploadOpen the assignment N3352 Module 1 Assignment 1 Family Interview Plan.docx  Download N3352 Module 1 Assignment 1 Family Interview Plan.docxfor details.Family Interview PlanThe major assignment for this course is an interview of a Family and an assessment of Family characteristics which is due in Module 5/Week 5You must schedule an interview to perform a family assessment during Module 1/Week 1. This interview will gather information for all of the weekly assignments. This family cannot be yours.You may use any resources from week two through five. The Friedman Family Assessment Short Formwill be very helpful to create your interview. Please schedule an interview to perform a family assessment during Module 1/Week 1It is strongly recommended that you conduct this interview by Module 2/week 2.This does not need to be face to face.In two to three sentences answer the following questions:Explain the types of things you will look for in the family.Provide a detailed plan with three areas of family assessment you will perform.What resources do you plan to use to complete the Family Assessment?What will be your greatest challenge in performing this interview?Complete and submit your assignment by 2359 Saturday of Module 1.AttachmentsN3352 Module 1 Assignment 1 Family Interview Plan-1.docx Download N3352 Module 1 Assignment 1 Family Interview Plan-1.docxFriedman Family Assessment form Download Friedman Family Assessment formRubricFamily Interview PlanFamily Interview PlanCriteriaRatingsPtsThis criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeFamily Interview PlanSchedule 25 point25 to >23.0 ptsTargetSchedule and conduct an interview with a family who is not your relative. The date of your scheduled interview listed23 to >5.0 ptsAcceptableSchedule an interview with a family who is not your relative. The date of your scheduled interview is vague or too general5 to >0 ptsUnacceptableNo interview scheduled. No date of your scheduled interview listed25 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeFamily Interview PlanDetailed description of plan 50 points50 to >48.0 ptsTargetDetailed plan with at least three areas of family assessment to discuss48 to >9.0 ptsAcceptableOutline of plan using two areas family assessment to discuss9 to >0 ptsUnacceptableGeneral family using one or zero areas of family assessment to discuss50 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeInterview Information25 to >23.0 ptsTargetDescribed resources used and what was the greatest learning23 to >6.0 ptsAcceptableResources and greatest learning information partial or insufficient6 to >0 ptsUnacceptableMinimal or missing information25 pts
Total Points: 100

Attached File:

Generate a list of experiences you have encountered that meet the criteria of transitions and turning points.

Generate a list of experiences you have encountered that meet the criteria of transitions and turning points.

Generate a list of experiences you have encountered that meet the criteria of transitions and turning points.

Generate a list of experiences you have encountered that meet the criteria of transitions and turning points. It may be that the life events you listed in Learning Task 3.1 (p. 54) and considered in Learning Task 3.2 (p. 61) will fi t the bill. Try, however, not to restrict yourself to these examples.

• Now think of clients you have worked with, and identify transitions and turning points they were facing at the time.

• Think about what marked these experiences out as transitions or turning point, and then, if possible, compare notes with a partner or small group of colleagues.

• Keep a record of these examples in your Learning Journal and keep them in mind as you read through the rest of this chapter. Consider the extent to which you can recognize the stages of transition in both your own and your clients’ experiences. The next Learning Task will ask you explicitly to plot your own transition through these different stages in relation to two different experiences.

Under U.S. constitutional law, a “minimum rational basis” test is used in the context of homosexuality: the government’s aim must be legitimate, and the means must be rationally related to this aim.

Under U.S. constitutional law, a “minimum rational basis” test is used in the context of homosexuality: the government’s aim must be legitimate, and the means must be rationally related to this aim.

Under U.S. constitutional law, a “minimum rational basis” test is used in the context of homosexuality: the government’s aim must be legitimate, and the means must be rationally related to this aim.

Under U.S. constitutional law, a “minimum rational basis” test is used in the context of homosexuality: the government’s aim must be legitimate, and the means must be rationally related to this aim. Romer v. Evans, 517 U.S. 620 (1996) (invalidating under rational basis test state constitutional amendment barring government agencies from adopting rules or policies that provide homosexual, lesbian, and bisexual classes protection against discrimination).

Note that Article 21 of Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability. Is this an emerging customary international legal norm? Has the United States accepted the norm by adopting the Americans with Disabilities Act?

U.S. constitutional law distinguishes between intentionally discriminatory actions and those with a disparate impact. Ordinarily, statutes with a disparate impact are required to satisfy only a requirement of rationality, while sometimes statutes that intentionally discriminate must satisfy a more stringent standard. Does the Human Rights Committee take a different approach? What justifications are there for distinguishing between intentional discrimination and disparate impact? Are they relevant to the problem in Simunek? Examine the racial and birth discrimination claims in Abdulaziz, Cabales and Balkandali v. United Kingdom, 94 Eur. Ct. H. R. (ser. A) (1985). Would these claims have succeeded under the UN Human Rights Committee’s analysis in Simunek?

U.S. constitutional law distinguishes between intentionally discriminatory actions and those with a disparate impact. Ordinarily, statutes with a disparate impact are required to satisfy only a requirement of rationality, while sometimes statutes that intentionally discriminate must satisfy a more stringent standard. Does the Human Rights Committee take a different approach? What justifications are there for distinguishing between intentional discrimination and disparate impact? Are they relevant to the problem in Simunek?  Examine the racial and birth discrimination claims in Abdulaziz, Cabales and Balkandali v. United Kingdom, 94 Eur. Ct. H. R. (ser. A) (1985). Would these claims have succeeded under the UN Human Rights Committee’s analysis in Simunek?

U.S. constitutional law distinguishes between intentionally discriminatory actions and those with a disparate impact. Ordinarily, statutes with a disparate impact are required to satisfy only a requirement of rationality, while sometimes statutes that intentionally discriminate must satisfy a more stringent standard. Does the Human Rights Committee take a different approach? What justifications are there for distinguishing between intentional discrimination and disparate impact? Are they relevant to the problem in Simunek? Examine the racial and birth discrimination claims in Abdulaziz, Cabales and Balkandali v. United Kingdom, 94 Eur. Ct. H. R. (ser. A) (1985). Would these claims have succeeded under the UN Human Rights Committee’s analysis in Simunek?

U.S. constitutional law distinguishes between intentionally discriminatory actions and those with a disparate impact. Ordinarily, statutes with a disparate impact are required to satisfy only a requirement of rationality, while sometimes statutes that intentionally discriminate must satisfy a more stringent standard. Does the Human Rights Committee take a different approach? What justifications are there for distinguishing between intentional discrimination and disparate impact? Are they relevant to the problem in Simunek?

Examine the racial and birth discrimination claims in Abdulaziz, Cabales and Balkandali v. United Kingdom, 94 Eur. Ct. H. R. (ser. A) (1985). Would these claims have succeeded under the UN Human Rights Committee’s analysis in Simunek?

Consider Schmidt v. Germany, 291-B Eur. Ct. H.R. (ser. A) (1994)

Consider Schmidt v. Germany, 291-B Eur. Ct. H.R. (ser. A) (1994)

Consider Schmidt v. Germany, 291-B Eur. Ct. H.R. (ser. A) (1994)

Consider Schmidt v. Germany, 291-B Eur. Ct. H.R. (ser. A) (1994). A German law required all male residents – but not female residents – of Tettnang, Germany, to either volunteer to work for the firemen or to pay a fee in contribution to the firemen. The male applicant challenged the fire-service levy as unlawful gender discrimination in violation of Article 14, ECHR. Howerver, Article 4(3)(d), ECHR, allows an exception to the prohibition against compulsory labor for normal civic obligations to ECHR states parties. The compulsory fire service in Schmidt’s town fell within this exception. The alternative financial contribution was considered a “compensatory charge” and because of its close links with the obligation to serve, also fell within the scope of Article 4(3)(d). The European Court stated that very weighty reasons would have to be put forward before the Court could regard a difference of treatment based exclusively on the grounds of sex as compatible with the Convention. Schmidt argued that the state interest in protecting women could not in itself justify a difference of treatment in this context. He pointed out that a more proportionate means for protecting women would be to take the biological differences between the sexes into account by a sensible division of the various tasks performed in the fire brigade. He also pointed out that as of 1992, close to seventy thousand women had served in fire brigades in Germany, and in his own town, the fire brigades had accepted women since 1978. Finally, Schmidt contended that since no man had ever been required to serve on the brigade, the regulation was really a purely fiscal one that women were as capable of complying with as men. This last claim is what ultimately swayed the European Court to decide the regulation was unlawful discrimination. The European Court did not rule on whether there existed any justification for treating men and women differently in regard to compulsory service in the fire brigade. The Court pointed out that this issue was not decisive in the present case in light of the continuing existence of a sufficient number of volunteers. No one had ever been obliged to serve in a fire brigade. Instead, the financial contribution had become effectively the only actual duty required by the Fire Brigades Act. In the imposition of such a financial burden, a difference of treatment on the ground of sex could “hardly be justified.” Accordingly, the European Court found there had been a violation of Article 14 taken in conjunction with Article 4(3)(d) of the Convention.

Under U.S. constitutional law, a “heightened rational basis” test is used in the context of gender discrimination: the classification must serve “important” governmental objectives, and the discriminatory means employed must be “substantially related” to the achievement of these ends.

Under U.S. constitutional law, a “heightened rational basis” test is used in the context of gender discrimination: the classification must serve “important” governmental objectives, and the discriminatory means employed must be “substantially related” to the achievement of these ends.

Under U.S. constitutional law, a “heightened rational basis” test is used in the context of gender discrimination: the classification must serve “important” governmental objectives, and the discriminatory means employed must be “substantially related” to the achievement of these ends.

Under U.S. constitutional law, a “heightened rational basis” test is used in the context of gender discrimination: the classification must serve “important” governmental objectives, and the discriminatory means employed must be “substantially related” to the achievement of these ends. Mississippi University for Women v. Hogan, 458 U.S. 718 (1982); see also United States v. Virginia, 116 S.Ct. 2264 (1996) (gender discrimination unconstitutional in absence of “exceedingly persuasive justification”).

Under U.S. federal statutory law, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex by employers. The Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978 extended the definition of sex to include pregnancy. International Union, UAW v. Johnson Controls, 499 U.S. 187 (1991). Refusal to hire on these grounds as well as harassment and hostile working environments are included within the scope of the statute. Meritor Savings Bank v. Vinson, 477 U.S. 57 (1986) (holding that sexual harassment in violation of Title VII exists in a workplace that creates a “hostile environment”). In addition, sex-based wage discrimination claims can also be brought under Title VII. County of Washington v. Gunther, 452 U.S. 161 (1981).

The main exception to the prohibition on purposeful discrimination is the bona fide occupational qualification (BFOQ), which provides that employers may refuse to hire on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, or national origin if members of the excluded class cannot perform the essential job duties. See, e.g., Dothard v. Rawlinson, 433 U.S. 321 (1977) (upholding Alabama prison practice of not hiring women guards because of unusually dangerous prison conditions). However, the federal courts have drawn this exception quite narrowly, refusing to accept stereotypes and customer preferences as justifications. See, e.g., Diaz v. Pan Am. World Airways, Inc., 442 F.2d 385 (5th Cir. 1971) (rejecting customer preference for female flight attendants as BFOQ); Weeks v. Southern Bell Tel. & Tel. Co., 408 F.2d 228 (5th Cir. 1969) (rejecting concern for welfare of women performing dangerous jobs as BFOQ).

Generate a list of experiences you have encountered that meet the criteria of transitions and turning points.

Generate a list of experiences you have encountered that meet the criteria of transitions and turning points.

Generate a list of experiences you have encountered that meet the criteria of transitions and turning points. It may be that the life events you listed in Learning Task 3.1 (p. 54) and considered in Learning Task 3.2 (p. 61) will fi t the bill. Try, however, not to restrict yourself to these examples.

• Now think of clients you have worked with, and identify transitions and turning points they were facing at the time.

• Think about what marked these experiences out as transitions or turning point, and then, if possible, compare notes with a partner or small group of colleagues.

• Keep a record of these examples in your Learning Journal and keep them in mind as you read through the rest of this chapter. Consider the extent to which you can recognize the stages of transition in both your own and your clients’ experiences. The next Learning Task will ask you explicitly to plot your own transition through these different stages in relation to two different experiences.

Generate a list of experiences you have encountered that meet the criteria of transitions and turning points.

Generate a list of experiences you have encountered that meet the criteria of transitions and turning points.

Generate a list of experiences you have encountered that meet the criteria of transitions and turning points. It may be that the life events you listed in Learning Task 3.1 (p. 54) and considered in Learning Task 3.2 (p. 61) will fi t the bill. Try, however, not to restrict yourself to these examples.

• Now think of clients you have worked with, and identify transitions and turning points they were facing at the time.

• Think about what marked these experiences out as transitions or turning point, and then, if possible, compare notes with a partner or small group of colleagues.

• Keep a record of these examples in your Learning Journal and keep them in mind as you read through the rest of this chapter. Consider the extent to which you can recognize the stages of transition in both your own and your clients’ experiences. The next Learning Task will ask you explicitly to plot your own transition through these different stages in relation to two different experiences.

As you learned earlier, a design check set is a collection of one or more design checks. For profiles, there are two types of design checks:

As you learned earlier, a design check set is a collection of one or more design checks. For profiles, there are two types of design checks:

As you learned earlier, a design check set is a collection of one or more design checks. For profiles, there are two types of design checks:

As you learned earlier, a design check set is a collection of one or more design checks. For profiles, there are two types of design checks: line and curve. When a design check set is applied to a profile, Civil 3D flags any violations with a triangular yellow shield marked with an exclamation point. You can hover over the shield to get more information about the violation.

In this exercise, you’ll apply a design check set to the Jordan Court profile and then make some edits to address design violations.

1. Open the drawing named Design Check Set.dwg located in the Chapter 07 class data folder.

2. Click the Jordan Court FGCL profile, and then click Profile Properties on the ribbon.

3. In the Profile Properties dialog box, click the Design Criteria tab and check the box next to Use Criteria-Based Design.

4. Check the Use Design Check Set box, and select Subdivision.

5. Click OK to close the Profile Properties dialog box. Press Esc to clear the grips on the profile and note the two yellow shields near the right end of the profile, as shown in Figure 7.10.

6. Zoom in to the area where the warning symbols are displayed. Hover the cursor over the symbol on the left.

The tooltip reports that the grade check is being violated for this tangent.

7. Click the profile to display its grips. Then click the PVI grip to the left of the warning symbol and move it upward.

8. Move the PVI down little by little until both tangent warning symbols disappear, indicating that you have satisfied the design check for both tangents.

9. Press Esc to clear the selection, and then hover your cursor over the remaining warning symbol.

10. Click the profile to display the grips, and then click one of the circular grips at either end of the curve and move it outward to lengthen the curve. When you lengthen the curve enough, the warning symbol disappears.

11. Save and close the drawing.

You can view the results of successfully completing this exercise by opening Design Check Set – Complete.dwg.

In this exercise, you’ll apply section styles to differentiate between sections that represent finished ground, existing ground, and rock surfaces.

In this exercise, you’ll apply section styles to differentiate between sections that represent finished ground, existing ground, and rock surfaces.

In this exercise, you’ll apply section styles to differentiate between sections that represent finished ground, existing ground, and rock surfaces.

In this exercise, you’ll apply section styles to differentiate between sections that represent finished ground, existing ground, and rock surfaces.

1. Open the drawing named Applying Section Styles.dwg located in the Chapter 11 class data folder.

Here, you see three section views that were plotted to investigate the shallow rock layer. The section views show a corridor section, existing ground surface section, and rock section.

2. Click the lowest section in the 8+50.00 (0+260.00) section view, and then click Section Properties on the Section: Rock ribbon tab.

3. On the Information tab of the Section Properties dialog box, change Object Style to Rock. Click OK to close the dialog box. Press Esc to clear the selection.

The rock section now appears as a gray dashed line.

4. Repeat the previous two steps for the section that appears above the rock layer, this time assigning a style of Existing Ground.

The section representing existing ground now appears as a red dashed line along with the rock section from the previous step (see Figure 11.1).

5. Click the lower section in the 9+00.00 (0+270.00) section view, right-click, and select Properties.

6. In the Properties window, change Style to Rock. Keep the Properties window open.

7. Press Esc to clear the selection of the rock section. Click the existing ground section, and use the Properties window to change its style to Existing Ground.

8. Press Esc to clear the previous selection, and then click one of the grid lines for the 9+25.00 (0+280.00) section view. Click Section View Properties on the ribbon.

9. On the Sections tab of the Section View Properties dialog box, in the Style column, change the style of the section named EG to Existing Ground, and for the section named Rock, change the style to Rock. Click OK to dismiss the Section View Properties dialog box. Press Esc to clear the selection.

All three section views should now properly display the existing ground and rock sections.

10. Save and close the drawing.

You can view the results of successfully completing this exercise by opening Applying Section Styles – Complete.dwg.