overall mutually benefiting knowledge base

overall mutually benefiting knowledge base

Once again you and your colleagues have collaborated to draw out the best in each of you to contribute to an overall mutually benefiting knowledge base of qualitative risk analysis information centered on the essential inputs, tools and techniques, and outputs necessary for performing qualitative risk analysis.  You are now required to do two things.  First, train Larry, Lucy, and the other LSDS project managers to do qualitative risk analysis.  Second, work with Larry and Lucy to complete a qualitative risk analysis for the LSDS-Jupiter Systems joint project. 
For your first requirement, prepare PowerPoint visual aids, twelve to fifteen slides, for the training you will deliver.  Since you will not be able to present live in the virtual space, use the speaker notes section of your PowerPoint visual aids to “voice”, “script”, or “record” what you would say to your audience.  Your last slide should be a References slide with APA formatted references, and you should use APA formatted citations to your references in the text of your speaker notes.
For the second requirement, you may use the PMBOK definitions of risk probability and impact in Section 7, and the probability and impact matrix in Section 8, but you must complete Section 6 Risk Categories of the PRMP, and then complete an initial qualitative risk analysis necessary for the LSDS-Jupiter Systems project.  Enter the results of your analysis for the identified threats and opportunities in the in columns 3, 4, and 5 of the Risk Register in Section 10.

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DATA COLLECTION

DATA COLLECTION

PIECE 2: DATA COLLECTION

Table of Contents

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Research Philosophy 3

Data collection methods 6

Summary of results presentation 6

Supporting appendices 9

Reference List 11

Research Philosophy

Research philosophy is a significant topic and in this context, it can be said that it is one of the most important aspects when any research study is taken into consideration. According to Cazeaux (2017), research philosophy is found to be dealing with the nature, source as well as development of knowledge. In other words, it can be said that research philosophy is referred to as a belief regarding the ways that can be implemented, which further helps in determining a phenomenon regarding the way, the data must be gathered, analysed as well as used (Business Research Methodology, 2021). The overall idea for creating knowledge might sound to be thoughtful, it is also referred to as being involved in the creation of knowledge, which is an important part of completing any research study. With respect to research philosophy, it has been stated by Kennedy (2017) that addressing the philosophy of the study in a particular study includes being conscious as well as the formulation of certain beliefs as well as assumptions. When the research onion is taken into consideration, it has been found that research philosophy is placed at the outermost layer of this research onion (Dougherty et al., 2019). Therefore, in this context, it can be said that it is one of the most important aspects of the study that helps the researcher in shaping an overall study in an effective way.

When any study is taken into consideration, it has been found that each stage of the research study is majorly based on several assumptions regarding the nature as well as sources of knowledge (Žukauskas et al., 2019). The philosophy of research is important as it majorly reflects the important assumptions. In the context of these assumptions, it can be said that these assumptions provide a base for setting a strategy for any study. In the context of research philosophy, it has been found that there are following major philosophies in a research study, which are listed as follows:

  • Positivism: In the context of positivism philosophy, it can be said that this particular philosophy seems to be difficult when it comes to explaining in a succinct as well as precise way. Abu-Alhaija (2019) has explained that there are significant differences between research settings, where this philosophy is utilised by the researcher. In the words of Blok (2018) positivism philosophy is found to be adhering to the perception that only factual knowledge that has been gained by observations are reliable. with respect to the studies that include positivism philosophy, it has been found that the researchers’ role is merely limited to the collection of data and interpreting the data objectively. In the context of such studies, the findings from such researches are generally observable as well as quantifiable (Encinas et al., 2020). It has also been stated by Schriewer (2017), this particular philosophy is majorly dependent upon the quantifiable observations that generally leads to statistical analysis. It has been further noted by Eggink and Dorrestijn (2018), positivism philosophy is in accordance with the empirical study that stems the knowledge from the experiences of humans. This form of study is found to have an ontological, atomistic perception regarding the world as comprising observable, discrete elements as well as the events that interact in a determined, observable as well as regular way.
  • Interpretivism: In regard to this philosophy, it has been found that this particular philosophy is also referred to as interpretivism, which includes the researcher interpreting the major elements present in the study. According to Qutoshi (2018), the researchers that implement this form of philosophy in the study mainly assumes that access to reality is mainly with the help of social constructions, such as consciousness, language, instruments and shared beliefs and meanings. In the context of the development of this philosophy, it can be said that the development is majorly on the basis of the positivism critique in terms of social sciences. It has been further opined by Kornberger and Mantere (2020) that this philosophy mainly focuses on qualitative analysis and not on quantitative analysis. In addition, it has also been found that this particular philosophy is majorly linked with the philosophical position of idealism and it is used for the groups in order to have a diverse approach, which includes social constructivism, phenomenology as well as hermeneutics. As per this approach, it is crucial for the researcher to act as a social actor in order to appreciate the difference present between individuals (Horne, 2021). This particular philosophy majorly focuses on the meaning and it may deploy several methodologies for reflecting several aspects of the issue.
  • Objectivism: In regard to objectivism, it can be said that it states that knowledge exists and it is waiting to be identified, therefore ignoring all the crucial roles of meaning in terms of knowledge construction (Ponce et al., 2020). In regard to this philosophy, it can be said that this particular philosophy is found to be dependent upon the idea of independence of reality from the mind of a human. It has been found that this particular philosophy is majorly based on the assumption of a specific scientific approach towards knowledge development (Vermaas and Vial, 2018). It can be segregated into two forms, direct and critical. Direct objectivism is referred to as naïve realism and it can be described as the thing that is perceived, it comes in that specific way. In other words, it has been stated by Nguyen et al. (2021) it majorly portrays the findings with the help of human senses. On the other hand, critical objectivism states that humans experience all the sensations as well as images of the real world. According to Quay et al. (2018), images, as well as sensations of the real world, can be deceptive and generally do not objectify the real scenario.
  • Pragmatism: In the context of this philosophy, it has been found that the research question plays the most important role. The researcher implementing this philosophy combines both interpretivisms as well as a positive approach within the scope of research as per the research question (Paul, 2017). In the context of this philosophy, it has been found that this particular philosophy accepts that the concepts are relevant only when they are able to support further actions. The pragmatics identify that there are several methods for interpreting the scenario and undertaking any study, and no single perception can provide a full description and there could be several realities.

With respect to this present study, the researcher has taken pragmatism into consideration. One of the most important reasons for selecting this philosophy is that this study is mainly either objective or subjective in nature. In addition, this form of philosophy will help the researcher in conducting a value as well as biased free study (Coghlan, 2017). In this regard, it can be said that it will help the researcher in providing an effective result for the study. In addition, it has also been opined by Rosiek and Gleason (2017) that this particular philosophy allows potential as well as the possibility to carry out work with respect to both, qualitative as well as quantitative data (Hassan et al., 2018). In this regard, it can be said that it further helps the researcher to identify the crucial points that help in linking the qualitative and quantitative data.

On the other hand, it has been found that the researcher has rejected positivism, interpretivism and objective philosophies. In this regard, it can be said that the main reason for rejecting these philosophies is the nature of the study and the data collected for the study. Regarding positivism, it can be said that it has been disregarded by the researcher in this study because implementing interpretivism means that the study will focus on subjective aspects of the study (Novikov and Novikov, 2019). However, in this present study, both aspects such as objective as well as subjective aspects are to be considered, hence, the researcher has not implemented interpretivism. This philosophy also has significant scope for bias, thus, to eliminate this issue, interpretivism has been disregarded. On the other hand, objectivism is also considered, as the researcher is required to focus on both qualitative and quantitative aspects of the study, therefore, this philosophy has also been rejected. Hence, on an overall basis, it can be said that the researcher has found certain loopholes in the rest of the philosophies, except Pragmatism. Therefore, pragmatism philosophy has been considered for this study.

Data collection methods

In the context of this study, the researcher has considered, the primary method for carrying out the study in an effective way. In order to carry out a primary study for the selected topic, it has been identified that the researcher has used mixed methods for conducting this primary study. In this regard, the researcher will collect data by implementing mixed methodologies, such as the quantitative method and qualitative method. In regard to the quantitative method, it can be said that this method is useful for collecting data through surveys. On the other hand, the interview is the aptest method for collecting qualitative data for this study.

Summary of results presentation

Part 1: Survey results

On the basis of the results, it has been found that five close-ended questions were asked from the respondents. The summary of the results are stated as follows:

Question 1: According to a 5-star rating perimeter, how user friendly and quick would you rate social media websites in your job-hunting process during the pandemic?

In regards to this question, it has been found that most of the participants (47.73%) have given four-star ratings in terms of experience regarding their job hunt during the pandemic. In this context, it can be said that the overall experience of the international students (job seekers) had a fairly good experience in terms of hunting for a job on social media sites. [Refer to figure 1]

Question 2: Which social media website would you rate as most productive according to your job-hunting experience?

In the context of this question, it has been found that around 52% of the participants have stated that LinkedIn is the most effective social media platform that has helped them in getting a job. In this context, it can be said that LinkedIn is the most effective platform for finding a job. [Refer to figure 2].

Question 3: How would you rate your job-hunting experience?

With respect to this question, around 47% of the respondents have stated that they had a relevantly easy procedure for hunting the job. In this regard, it can be said that searching for a job on online platforms is relatively easy and hassle-free [Refer to figure 3].

Question 4: Do you agree that the English language is a barrier for international students as part of their Job Interviews?

In the context of this question, it has been found that the around 68% of the participants have agreed to the given statement that the English language is a barrier for international students while finding jobs and as a part of their job interviews. [Refer to figure 4]

Question 5: How many jobs did you apply for online during covid-19?

With respect to this, it has been found that around 32% of the people have applied to 1 to 5 jobs during the pandemic, around 20% of the respondents have applied to 5 to 10 jobs during the pandemic, 18% have applied to 10 to 25 jobs and rest have stated that they have applied to many jobs that they lose a track. In this regard, it has been found that the respondents have applied to a lot of jobs during the pandemic period. [Refer to figure 5].

Part 2: Qualitative (Open-end discussion)

Question 1: Do you think that the number of job applications made can determine the time frame of securing a job?

On the basis of the discussion, it has been summarised that the number of job applications is not significantly helpful in determining the time frame for securing a job. In this regard, it has been identified that people can apply to several job applications and applying to the most relevant job application is helpful in gaining a job. In addition, it is also important for the candidate to pose a significant set of skills to be eligible for securing a job. Apart from this, significant experience in relevant skills would be helpful in securing a job.

Question 2: How far do you think that social media profiles of applicants have replaced the conventional CV?

In this regard, it has been summarised that social media profiles have significant replaced conventional CVs. The profiles on social media platforms distinctively tell a lot about the candidate and with appropriate tools, it helps the employer to shortlist the effective and the right set of candidates. Thus, it can be said that social media profiles have replaced the conventional CV.

Question 3: Do you think that Linked In is a virtual CV for a candidate?

In this regard, some of the participants have stated that LinkedIn is a virtual CV platform for a particular candidate. This platform is helpful for demonstrating professional skills and eventually help in demonstrating the overall profile of a candidate in a better way. However, it is important for the candidate to ensure that LinkedIn has all the correct and apt information about the candidate.

Question 4: Do you think that Job hunting experience during the pandemic was relaxed while having strong references in the relevant industry?

In this regard, it has been found that at the time of the pandemic there has been a reduction in job opportunities. Therefore, having a strong reference base in the relevant industry is very helpful for candidates looking for a job in a relevant field. It helps in promoting skills and also help in gaining a job in a particular industry. On the other hand, it is also helpful in establishing a better relationship within the industry.

Question 5: How critical do you think the Native British accent is a hurdle while taking job interviews?

With respect to this question, some of the participants have stated that native British accents act as a major limitation in securing jobs and clearing job interviews. International students have different accents than native British, which provides inclarity of speech and thus eventually hampers the job interview process of international students.

Analysis:

With respect to the response of the first respondent, it has been found that the number of job applications made helps the candidates in securing a job. In this context, the respondent states that out of 51% of the job seekers receive job offers by at least giving three job interviews. In regard to the second question, it has been found that social media profiles have massively replaced the conventional CV. It has been further stated by the respondent that the employer firstly goes through the social media profile before offering the job. It helps them in conducting a background check of the applicant. Further, the respondent also states that LinkedIn cannot take place of the conventional CV. In this context, it has been stated that the candidate can make their profile interesting by adding some additional features to their LinkedIn profile. Thus, LinkedIn cannot replace the conventional CV. During a pandemic, the organisations were not hiring, so even though having a strong reference within the relevant industry could not help the job seekers to get the job. Regarding Native British accent, there should be clarity of speech while communicating.

When the responses of the second participant are taken into consideration, it has been analysed that it is necessary for the candidate for maintaining a time frame in terms of securing a job. In the context of the conventional CVs of the candidates and its replacement with social media profiles of the candidates, the participant has responded that it is important for a candidate to have a social media profile because it makes it easier for the recruiter to see all the major credibilities and have a better image of the candidates. Regarding LinkedIn as a virtual CV for the candidate, it has been opined by this participant that LinkedIn act as a platform for demonstrating their CV for the recruiters. Having a significant reference in the relevant industry have helped the job seekers to gain jobs during the pandemic as well. Being able to communicate properly is the most crucial asset for a job seeker, and hence, having a better British accent is helpful while taking job interviews, as stated by the second participant.

With respect to the third respondent, it has been stated that the number of job applications made help the job seekers in securing a job, as getting a job is a lengthy process and needs ample time. Further, in regard to the second question, the respondent has stated that social media profiles have replaced conventional CVs in the last few years. The respondent has further stated that updating information in the LinkedIn act as a virtual CV for job seekers. Having strong references has not been helpful in securing jobs for job seekers because the pandemic has created a lot of uncertainties across the world. The participant also stated that British Accent is very different and it is mandatory for the job seekers to have a better and clear accent.

In the context of the responses given by the fourth participant, it has been found that the respondent has stated that it is mandatory for applying for a number of job applications. In this regard, the participant has further added that one never knows which job application will land up getting a job. In the context of the second question, the respondent has stated that social media have significantly replaced conventional CVs, as there is a significant shift towards social media. Additionally, the respondent has further stated that LinkedIn act as a virtual CV for the participants. Having a significant reference in the relevant industry is also helpful to get a job and it has helped many to get a job during the pandemic. In the context of the last question, the respondent stated that the native British accent is not a hurdle because knowing the language is the key and not the accent.

Supporting appendices

Figure 1: User-friendliness of social media platforms for searching jobs

(Source: Created by the researcher)

Figure 2: Most productive social media sites for searching jobs

(Source: Created by the researcher)

Figure 3: Social media job hunting experience

(Source: Created by the learner)

Figure 4: Native English language acting as a barrier for international students regarding online job advertisements

(Source: Created by the learner)

Figure 5: Application to online jobs during a pandemic

(Source: Created by the learner)

Reference List

Abu-Alhaija, A.S., 2019. From Epistemology to Structural Equation Modeling: An Essential Guide in Understanding the Principles of Research Philosophy in Selecting the Appropriate Methodology. Australian Journal of Basic and Applied Sciences13(9), pp.122-128.

Blok, V., 2018. Philosophy of innovation: A research agenda. Philosophy of Management17(1), pp.1-5.

Business Research Methodology, 2021. Research Philosophy. Available at: https://research-methodology.net/research-philosophy/ [Accessed on 12 December 2021]

Cazeaux, C., 2017. Art, research, philosophy (p. 202). Taylor & Francis.

Coghlan, D., 2017. How might we learn about the philosophy of ODC research from 24 volumes of ROCD? An invitation to interiority. In Research in organizational change and development. Emerald Publishing Limited.

Dougherty, M.R., Slevc, L.R. and Grand, J.A., 2019. Making research evaluation more transparent: Aligning research philosophy, institutional values, and reporting. Perspectives on Psychological Science14(3), pp.361-375.

Eggink, W. and Dorrestijn, S., 2018, June. Philosophy of Technology x Design: the practical turn. In Design Research Society 2018: Catalyst (pp. 190-199). Design Research Society.

Encinas, E., Durrant, A.C., Mitchell, R. and Blythe, M., 2020, April. Metaprobes, metaphysical workshops and sketchy philosophy. In Proceedings of the 2020 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (pp. 1-13).

Hassan, N.R., Mingers, J. and Stahl, B., 2018. Philosophy and information systems: where are we and where should we go?.

Horne, J., 2021. The philosophy of research.

Kennedy, A.M., 2017. Macro-social marketing research: philosophy, methodology and methods. Journal of Macromarketing37(4), pp.347-355.

Kornberger, M. and Mantere, S., 2020. Thought experiments and philosophy in organizational research. Organization Theory1(3), p.2631787720942524.

Nguyen, M.N., Pandey, S.R., Thar, K., Tran, N.H., Chen, M., Bradley, W.S. and Hong, C.S., 2021. Distributed and democratized learning: Philosophy and research challenges. IEEE Computational Intelligence Magazine16(1), pp.49-62.

Novikov, A.M. and Novikov, D.A., 2019. Research methodology: From philosophy of science to research design. CRC Press.

Paul, K.B., 2017. Introducing interpretive approach of phenomenological research methodology in environmental philosophy: A mode of engaged philosophy in the Anthropocene. International Journal of Qualitative Methods16(1), p.1609406917724916.

Ponce, O.A., Pagán-Maldonado, N. and Galánb, J.G., 2020. Philosophy of educational research: New epistemological, methodological and historical approach. International Journal of Educational Excellence6(2), pp.63-79.

Quay, J., Bleazby, J., Stolz, S.A., Toscano, M. and Webster, R.S. eds., 2018. Theory and philosophy in education research: Methodological dialogues. Routledge.

Qutoshi, S.B., 2018. Phenomenology: A philosophy and method of inquiry. Journal of Education and Educational Development5(1).

Rosiek, J. and Gleason, T., 2017. Philosophy in research on teacher education: An ontoethical turn. The SAGE handbook of research on teacher education, pp.29-48.

Schriewer, J., 2017. Between the philosophy of self-cultivation and empirical research: Educational studies in Germany. Knowledge and the study of education: An international exploration, pp.75-99.

Vermaas, P.E. and Vial, S. eds., 2018. Advancements in the Philosophy of Design. Springer.

Žukauskas, P., Vveinhardt, J. and Andriukaitienė, R., 2018. Philosophy and paradigm of scientific research. Management Culture and Corporate Social Responsibility121.

Assessment Title

Assessment Title

Assessment Title:Design a networked computer system

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Assignment Brief:

OPTINET Ltd is specialised in delivering IT infrastructure solutions to medium-sized organisations world-wide. With the expansion of the company, a newly acquired branch needs a network. Your manager is faced with the demands of business and plethora of technology challenges.

You have been recently hired as a Network Engineer and assigned the task of designing and implementing a network that is based on the requirements and specifications outlined by your manager.

Additionally, you are responsible for monitoring the network firewall, assessing the functionality of the network router, ensuring all Internet security software is updated regularly, developing and implementing company email policies and maintaining the company phone system.

Each group has been assigned the task of designing, implementing a network infrastructure for OPTINET Ltd by internetworking three departments which are as follows:

Finance: 10 PCs (or Laptops)& 1 printer Production: 45 PCs (or Laptops)&1 printer
Sales: 60 PCs (or Laptops) &1 printer IP Telephony (VoIP): all desktops have an associated telephone set.

The network consists of 4 Servers:

HTTP Email
DNS File

All servers are shared between all users.

Assessment Deliverables:

The IT Manager emphasised on scalability, availability and hence you are required to provide a complete network infrastructure design and implementation.OPTINET ltd will be using the following IP address: 192.168.10.0/24.

  1. Design a networked system to meet the given specifications. Use packet tracer software to design your network.
  2. Test and evaluate the design to meet the requirements. Install and configure network services and applications. Design a maintenance schedule to support the networked system.
  3. Use all the TCP/IP command lines to troubleshoot your designed network. At this stage you may need to identify the cause of any problem on your designed network and find a possible solution.
  4. Usually, implementing a possible solution involves making changes to the network, therefore, document and analyse the test results against expected outcomes.
  5. Recommend potential improvements for the networked systems. And finally, use critical reflection to evaluate own work and justify valid conclusions.

Assignment Brief

UNIVERSITY CENTRE CROYDON
Module — Assignment Brief Level 6 — Honours Level
Se—Vref
Course and year: BAD-Ions) Business with Marketing 2018-19 Module and code: Integrated Marketing Communications IMC600 Brief title: Samuel’s Furniture Store (6IRP30) c 2cstc c.,3 c–cc 5 ) Teaching staff: Aliya Mullani Module leader: Aliya Mullani Semester & mode: Semester ‘I Brief written by: Aliya Mullani Verified by: Emma Elliott
Please refer to the module specification in your Programme Handbook for the learning outcomes and to the assessment regulations contained in the current Academic & Assessment Regulations, which appear in full on the Student Intranet.
Task
Samuel Brown was excited. His new enterprise, Samuel’s Furniture Store, was about to open. Samuel had been in the furniture business for more than 10 years, first as a delivery and setup man and then as an in-store salesperson. This was his big chance to launch out on his own. Using some money that he inherited, various loans, and the investment of a silent partner, the mid-price-range retail furniture store was ready for business.
Samuel’s Furniture Store was located outside the town limits of a large urban area. The store was part of a large corner cluster. Samuel’s agreement with the other tenants was to stay out of the mattress and bedding business, because another retailer sold those items exclusively. For the same reason, he also agreed that he would not sell television sets or stereos. A “country-kitchen” chain restaurant was located across the parking lot from the retail stores. The entire shopping complex could be reached easily, because of its convenient location next to the motorway.
At the high end, there were likely to be suppliers who focused on attracting affluent customers. At the lower end, he faced large warehouse-style operations offering low prices and prompt delivery of lower-quality pieces. In the middle, several retail chains sold various furnishings. Specialty stores that focused solely on recliners were also close by.
Two advantages gave Samuel hope that his store would be a grand success. The first was his extensive knowledge of the retail furniture business. He knew how various stores competed, whether through price, quality, “deals,” or other tactics. His knowledge extended to the various manufacturers. Samuel knew which ones gave the best deals, which ones delivered merchandise on time (or late), and the quality levels of the pieces sold.
The second advantage was Samuel’s extensive potential customer base. Samuel had been

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Last year

Last year
Last year our laboratory made a breakthrough in design that really made our sales skyrocket. – 5 ptsYou will need to pin down Mr. Wang on what his plan of engagement will be with the new client. – 5 ptsRecent losses have us on the ropes now, but we expect to get out of the hole by the end of the year. – 5 ptsOur new Director was blunt, we need to stop beating around the bush and expand our training efforts. – 5 ptsWe will pull the plug on any of our new products that continue to flatline after 6 months. – 5 ptsMary Smith managed to restructure her approach towards customer service and made herself our latest rock-star. – 5 ptsNow that we have cut back on our telemarketing, we can beef up our radio advertising. – 5 ptsI told them for the umpteenth time, we need to address the parking problems at our present location. – 5 ptsYou are driving me crazy! Do you want to make the presentation or don’t you? – 5 ptsI suggested that Jack do something regarding the content of our staff meetings. I mean really, attending one is like watching paint dry. – 5 ptsRubricWeek 2: Rewriting Activity RubricWeek 2: Rewriting Activity RubricCriteriaRatingsPtsThis criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeSentence 15 ptsExceeds ExpectationsStudent response identified word or phrase that would be unfamiliar to nonnative English speaker and provided a rewrite that is clear, complete, and understandable.3 ptsMeets ExpectationsStudent response identified word or phrase that would be unfamiliar to nonnative English speaker but was unclear in the rewrite they provided. Replacement sentence lacked good sentence structure.1 ptsBelow ExpectationsStudent response failed to identify the word or phrase that made the sentence unfamiliar to, or difficult to read, for nonnative English speakers.5 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeSentence 25 ptsExceeds ExpectationsStudent response identified word or phrase that would be unfamiliar to nonnative English speaker and provided a rewrite that is clear, complete, and understandable.3 ptsMeets ExpectationsStudent response identified word or phrase that would be unfamiliar to nonnative English speaker but was unclear in the rewrite they provided. Replacement sentence lacked good sentence structure.1 ptsBelow ExpectationsStudent response failed to identify the word or phrase that made the sentence unfamiliar to, or difficult to read, for nonnative English speakers.5 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeSentence 35 ptsExceeds ExpectationsStudent response identified word or phrase that would be unfamiliar to nonnative English speaker and provided a rewrite that is clear, complete, and understandable.3 ptsMeets ExpectationsStudent response identified word or phrase that would be unfamiliar to nonnative English speaker but was unclear in the rewrite they provided. Replacement sentence lacked good sentence structure.1 ptsBelow ExpectationsStudent response failed to identify the word or phrase that made the sentence unfamiliar to, or difficult to read, for nonnative English speakers.5 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeSentence 45 ptsExceeds ExpectationsStudent response identified word or phrase that would be unfamiliar to nonnative English speaker and provided a rewrite that is clear, complete, and understandable.3 ptsMeets ExpectationsStudent response identified word or phrase that would be unfamiliar to nonnative English speaker but was unclear in the rewrite they provided. Replacement sentence lacked good sentence structure.1 ptsBelow ExpectationsStudent response failed to identify the word or phrase that made the sentence unfamiliar to, or difficult to read, for nonnative English speakers.5 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeSentence 55 ptsExceeds ExpectationsStudent response identified word or phrase that would be unfamiliar to nonnative English speaker and provided a rewrite that is clear, complete, and understandable.3 ptsMeets ExpectationsStudent response identified word or phrase that would be unfamiliar to nonnative English speaker but was unclear in the rewrite they provided. Replacement sentence lacked good sentence structure.1 ptsBelow ExpectationsStudent response failed to identify the word or phrase that made the sentence unfamiliar to, or difficult to read, for nonnative English speakers.5 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeSentence 65 ptsExceeds ExpectationsStudent response identified word or phrase that would be unfamiliar to nonnative English speaker and provided a rewrite that is clear, complete, and understandable.3 ptsMeets ExpectationsStudent response identified word or phrase that would be unfamiliar to nonnative English speaker but was unclear in the rewrite they provided. Replacement sentence lacked good sentence structure.1 ptsBelow ExpectationsStudent response failed to identify the word or phrase that made the sentence unfamiliar to, or difficult to read, for nonnative English speakers.5 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeSentence 75 ptsExceeds ExpectationsStudent response identified word or phrase that would be unfamiliar to nonnative English speaker and provided a rewrite that is clear, complete, and understandable.3 ptsMeets ExpectationsStudent response identified word or phrase that would be unfamiliar to nonnative English speaker but was unclear in the rewrite they provided. Replacement sentence lacked good sentence structure.1 ptsBelow ExpectationsStudent response failed to identify the word or phrase that made the sentence unfamiliar to, or difficult to read, for nonnative English speakers.5 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeSentence 85 ptsExceeds ExpectationsStudent response identified word or phrase that would be unfamiliar to nonnative English speaker and provided a rewrite that is clear, complete, and understandable.3 ptsMeets ExpectationsStudent response identified word or phrase that would be unfamiliar to nonnative English speaker but was unclear in the rewrite they provided. Replacement sentence lacked good sentence structure.1 ptsBelow ExpectationsStudent response failed to identify the word or phrase that made the sentence unfamiliar to, or difficult to read, for nonnative English speakers.5 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeSentence 95 ptsExceeds ExpectationsStudent response identified word or phrase that would be unfamiliar to nonnative English speaker and provided a rewrite that is clear, complete, and understandable.3 ptsMeets ExpectationsStudent response identified word or phrase that would be unfamiliar to nonnative English speaker but was unclear in the rewrite they provided. Replacement sentence lacked good sentence structure.1 ptsBelow ExpectationsStudent response failed to identify the word or phrase that made the sentence unfamiliar to, or difficult to read, for nonnative English speakers.5 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeSentence 105 ptsExceeds ExpectationsStudent response identified word or phrase that would be unfamiliar to nonnative English speaker and provided a rewrite that is clear, complete, and understandable.3 ptsMeets ExpectationsStudent response identified word or phrase that would be unfamiliar to nonnative English speaker but was unclear in the rewrite they provided. Replacement sentence lacked goo

stress path

stress path

Assignments (Submission is required)

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Q4. Explain, using stress path plots, why the unconsolidated undrained (UU) triaxial test can either underestimate or overestimate the undrained shear strength su of soil. State the conditions under which the su value of a soil can be overestimated or underestimated.
Q5 A large embankment is to be constructed on a site with the typical soil profile as shown in Figure Q5. The effective overburden stress, o’v0, profile and the preconsolidation stress, �’p, profile are also shown in Figure Q5. Before the construction of the embankment, a laboratory study using the isotropic consolidated undrained triaxial compression (CIUC) tests has established a su/o’v0 versus OCR relationship for the clay layer as su/o�v0 = 0.23 OCR0.75, where su is the undrained shear strength and OCR is the overconsolidation ratio.
Referring to Figure Q5, calculate the su values of the soil at depths of 2 m and 9 m before and after the soil has been consolidated. The contact pressure at the base of the embankment is 200 kPa.

Pushing Integers to the Stack

Pushing Integers to the Stack

il MUM
where num is 4.1 push 4.1.1 Pushing Integers to the Stack
I) Nan integer possibly with a suggesting a negative value. -Here, •-(i’ should be regarded as ‘0’. Entering this expression will simply push num onto the stack. For example,
ill Pa PliSh 5 push -0
stark
If num is not an integer, only push the error literal (:error:) onto the stack instead of pushing num. For example,
input stack push 5 :error: push 2.5 :error: push -x _ 5
4.1.2 Pushing Strings to the Stack
push string
where string is a string literal consisting of a sequence of characters enclosed in double quotation marks, as in “this is a string”. Executing this command would push the string onto the stack:
input
stack
push “dvacipool” push “batman” push “this is a string “
this this a string batman cheadpool
Spaces are preserved in the string, ie any preceding or trailing whitespace must be kept inside the string that is pushed to the stack:
input stack pus i lea( p on push “this is a string ” 1 is.., 1 s,a_string_ deadp_ool
You can assume that the string value would always be legal and not contain quotations or escape sequences within the string itself, i.e double quotes nor backslashes will appear inside a string.
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FINAL Project

FINAL Project

Cpr E 281 FINAL PROJECT ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY
FINAL Project
Project #2: 8-bit Booth’s Multiplier See the grading RUBRIC below before starting with the design.
As you learned earlier in the semester, multiplication is effectively repeated shifting and addition. This understanding can be used to reduce the area of a hardware multiplier by implementing a sequential multiplication circuit. Unfortunately, this means that for each bit of the multiplier there is both an add and a shift, even for cases like *0 where no adds are necessary. Therefore, you are tasked with designing an 8-bit sequential multiplier based on Booth’s algorithm (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Booth%27s multiplication algorithm). Your Booth’s algorithm multiplier should have an FSM for controlling the algorithm and a datapath that includes a register file, a modified adder-subtractor circuit (needs selective sign extension), and some single flip-flops to represent P[4]/carries/signs.
The register file has two read ports, a single write port, and contains just four 8-bit registers (multiplicand–m, lower result–P[7:0], upper result–P[15:8], and count).
Behavior: Step 1: Initialization * Load the multiplicand from toggle switches 0-7. * Load the multiplier into the lower result register from toggle switches 8-15. * P[-1] is initialized to 0. Step 2: Multiplication * Read P lower and check the value of p[0:-1]: If 01 add a sign-extension of m to P (this is a multi-step process since P is a 16-bit value). If 10 add a sign-extension of -m to P (this is a multi-step process since P is a 16-bit value). If 00 or 11 don’t add or subtract. * Right shift P (use an arithmetic shift where P’s sign doesn’t change). * Repeat these steps until they have been done 8 times. Step 3: Display result * Display the result (i.e., P[15:0]) on the 7-segment display using pushbutton 0 to toggle between the upper and lower half.
Example of Booth’s Multiplication of two 5-bit numbers:

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text data

text data
  1. When processing text data, it is often important to recognize the presence of certain keywords, Write a function that takes a character string as input and returns a vector of the days of the week that are found in the character string. The function should have the following characteristics:
    • Its name is
    days .found
    • It has exactly one formal argument called string with default value “”
    • It returns a vector of class character Note that the function character( . . .) can be used to create a character vector.
    • if more than one day of the week is found, then the return vector contains all of the days found in the typical order, i.e., “Sunday” would come before “Monday” , which would come before “Tuesday” , and “Saturday” would come last. Note that the clays returned should have full spelling and proper capitalization. • If no matching days are found, then it returns a vector of length zero. • If multiple instances of the same day of the week are found, then it only returns that day of the week once, • Its search is case insensitive.
    • It does not match partial clays of the week, c,g,, “Sat” and “thurs” would not be matches for “Saturday” and “Thursday” . It does not match misspellings.
    Sonic examples of the function’s output are shown next: > days.found(string = “Lunch on Monday, tuesday, Wed, or Tursday?”) [1] “Monday” “Tuesday” > days. found (string 4 “Appointment on thursdays”) [1] “Thursday”
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underlying principle of customer

underlying principle of customer

The underlying principle of customer care is to acknowledge the diverse cultures of the New Zealand metropolitan customers.
NZQF Leval 6 Descriptor:
Knowledge: Specialised technical or Analyse and generate
Skills:
theoretical knowledge with depth in a field of work or f unfamiliar problems. 1 study.
solutions to familiar and
Select and apply a range of
standard and non-standard processes relevant to the field of work or study.
Application of knowledge
and skills: Complete self-management of learning and performance within dynamic contexts. Responsibility for leadership within dynamic contexts.
Aim / -urpose To enable students to analyse the Road Transport Guidelines and its application in business
processes.
Learning outcomes

  • – On successful completion learning the students will be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding at level 6 relating to: 1. Road Transport components and characteristics. 2. Vehicle related regulations. 3. Infrastructure related regulations. 4. Personnel related regulations. 5. Regulatory organisations.
    Assessment overview This course is project based and you are required to undertake study of concepts of transport classifications, transport regulations, legal issues pertaining transportation, concepts of insurances in transportation, risks management, the practices and associated with health and safety and environment in road transport and costs associated with road transport guidelines. To critically analyse Road Transport Guidelines, you need to undertake industry engagement and complete your report. Your assessment is distributed as per schedule.
    CAUsersjtawaketiniDownloadsDesktopAssessment packageAPTE 6514 APTE 6514 R Transport Guidelines assessmen package 2 2018.docx6514 Road Transport Guidelines A oad Assessment Package July 2018
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