EAP 500 – English for Academic Purposes Below is an excerpt from a speech by a former US president, Theodore Roosevelt about what it means to be an American citizen. Some parts of this text may pro EAP 500 – English for Academic Purposes Below is an excerpt from a speech by a former US president, Theodore Roosevelt about what it means to be an American citizen.  Some parts of this text may promote ideas seem antediluvian to us today.  Read through the excerpt and answer the questions that follow. “Duties of American Citizenship” by Theodore Roosevelt Buffalo, New York, January 26, 1883 Of course, in one sense, the first essential for a man’s being a good citizen is his possession of the home virtues of which we think when we call a man by the emphatic adjective of manly. No man can be a good citizen who is not a good husband and a good father, who is not honest in his dealings with other men and women, faithful to his friends and fearless in the presence of his foes, who has not got a sound heart, a sound mind, and a sound body; exactly as no amount of attention to civil duties will save a nation if the domestic life is undermined, or there is lack of the rude military virtues which alone can assure a country’s position in the world. In a free republic the ideal citizen must be one willing and able to take arms for the defense of the flag, exactly as the ideal citizen must be the father of many healthy children. A race must be strong and vigorous; it must be a race of good fighters and good breeders, else its wisdom will come to naught and its virtue be ineffective; and no sweetness and delicacy, no love for and appreciation of beauty in art or literature, no capacity for building up material prosperity can possibly atone for the lack of the great virile virtues. But this is aside from my subject, for what I wish to talk of is the attitude of the American citizen in civic life. It ought to be axiomatic in this country that every man must devote a reasonable share of his time to doing his duty in the Political life of the community. No man has a right to shirk his political duties under whatever plea of pleasure or business; and while such shirking may be pardoned in those of small cleans it is entirely unpardonable in those among whom it is most common–in the people whose circumstances give them freedom in the struggle for life. In so far as the community grows to think rightly, it will likewise grow to regard the young man of means who shirks his duty to the State in time of peace as being only one degree worse than the man who thus shirks it in time of war. A great many of our men in business, or of our young men who are bent on enjoying life (as they have a perfect right to do if only they do not sacrifice other things to enjoyment), rather plume themselves upon being good citizens if they even vote; yet voting is the very least of their duties, Nothing worth gaining is ever gained without effort. You can no more have freedom without striving and suffering for it than you can win success as a banker or a lawyer without labor and effort, without self-denial in youth and the display of a ready and alert intelligence in middle age. The people who say that they have not time to attend to politics are simply saying that they are unfit to live in a free community. Their place is under a despotism; or if they are content to do nothing but vote, you can take despotism tempered by an occasional plebiscite, like that of the second Napoleon. In one of Lowell’s magnificent stanzas about the Civil War he speaks of the fact which his countrymen were then learning, that freedom is not a gift that tarries long in the hands of cowards: nor yet does it tarry long in the hands of the sluggard and the idler, in the hands of the man so much absorbed in the pursuit of pleasure or in the pursuit of gain, or so much wrapped up in his own easy home life as to be unable to take his part in the rough struggle with his fellow men for political supremacy. If freedom is worth having, if the right of self-government is a valuable right, then the one and the other must be retained exactly as our forefathers acquired them, by labor, and especially by labor in organization, that is in combination with our fellows who have the same interests and the same principles. We should not accept the excuse of the business man who attributed his failure to the fact that his social duties were so pleasant and engrossing that he had no time left for work in his office; nor would we pay much heed to his further statement that he did not like business anyhow because he thought the morals of the business community by no means what they should be, and saw that the great successes were most often won by men of the Jay Gould stamp. It is just the same way with politics. It makes one feel half angry and half amused, and wholly contemptuous, to find men of high business or social standing in the community saying that they really have not got time to go to ward meetings, to organize political clubs, and to take a personal share in all the important details of practical politics; men who further urge against their going the fact that they think the condition of political morality low, and are afraid that they may be required to do what is not right if they go into politics. The first duty of an American citizen, then, is that he shall work in politics; his second duty is that he shall do that work in a practical manner; and his third is that it shall be done in accord with the highest principles of honor and justice. Of course, it is not possible to define rigidly just the way in which the work shall be made practical. Each man’s individual temper and convictions must be taken into account. To a certain extent his work must be done in accordance with his individual beliefs and theories of right and wrong. To a yet greater extent it must be done in combination with others, he yielding or modifying certain of his own theories and beliefs so as to enable him to stand on a common ground with his fellows, who have likewise yielded or modified certain of their theories and beliefs. There is no need of dogmatizing about independence on the one hand or party allegiance on the other. There are occasions when it may be the highest duty of any man to act outside of parties and against the one with which he has himself been hitherto identified; and there may be many more occasions when his highest duty is to sacrifice some of his own cherished opinions for the sake of the success of the party which he on the whole believes to be right. I do not think that the average citizen, at least in one of our great cities, can very well manage to support his own party all the time on every issue, local and otherwise; at any rate if he can do so he has been more fortunately placed than I have been. On the other hand, I am fully convinced that to do the best work people must be organized; and of course an organization is really a party, whether it be a great organization covering the whole nation and numbering its millions of adherents, or an association of citizens in a particular locality, banded together to win a certain specific victory, as, for instance, that of municipal reform. Somebody has said that a racing-yacht, like a good rifle, is a bundle of incompatibilities; that you must get the utmost possible sail power without sacrificing some other quality if you really do get the utmost sail power, that, in short you have got to make more or less of a compromise on each in order to acquire the dozen things needful; but, of course, in making this compromise you must be very careful for the sake of something unimportant not to sacrifice any of the great principles of successful naval architecture. Well, it is about so with a man’s political work. He has got to preserve his independence on the one hand; and on the other, unless he wishes to be a wholly ineffective crank, he has got to have some sense of party allegiance and party responsibility, and he has got to realize that in any given exigency it may be a matter of duty to sacrifice one quality, or it may be a matter of duty to sacrifice the other. If it is difficult to lay down any fixed rules for party action in the abstract; it would, of course, be wholly impossible to lay them down for party action in the concrete, with reference to the organizations of the present day. I think that we ought to be broad-minded enough to recognize the fact that a good citizen, striving with fearlessness, honesty, and common sense to do his best for the nation, can render service to it in many different ways, and by connection with many different organizations. It is well for a man if he is able conscientiously to feel that his views on the great questions of the day, on such questions as the tariff, finance, immigration, the regulation of the liquor traffic, and others like them, are such as to put him in accord with the bulk of those of his fellow citizens who compose one of the greatest parties: but it is perfectly supposable that he may feel so strongly for or against certain principles held by one party, or certain principles held by the other, that he is unable to give his full adherence to either. In such a case I feel that he has no right to plead this lack of agreement with either party as an excuse for refraining from active political work prior to election. It will, of course, bar him from the primaries of the two leading parties, and preclude him from doing his share in organizing their management; but, unless he is very unfortunate, he can surely find a number of men who are in the same position as himself and who agree with him on some specific piece of political work, and they can turn in practically and effectively long before election to try to do this new piece of work in a practical manner. One seemingly very necessary caution to utter is, that a man who goes into politics should not expect to reform everything right off, with a jump. I know many excellent young men who, when awakened to the fact that they have neglected their political duties, feel an immediate impulse to form themselves into an organization which shall forthwith purify politics everywhere, national, State, and city alike; and I know of a man who having gone round once to a primary, and having, of course, been unable to accomplish anything in a place where he knew no one and could not combine with anyone, returned saying it was quite useless for a good citizen to try to accomplish anything in such a manner. To these too hopeful or too easily discouraged people I always feel like reading Artemus Ward’s article upon the people of his town who came together in a meeting to resolve that the town should support the Union and the Civil War, but were unwilling to take any part in putting down the rebellion unless they could go as brigadier-generals. After the battle of Bull Run there were a good many hundreds of thousands of young men in the North who felt it to be their duty to enter the Northern armies; but no one of them who possessed much intelligence expected to take high place at the outset, or anticipated that individual action would be of decisive importance in any given campaign. He went in as private or sergeant, lieutenant or captain, as the case might be, and did his duty in his company, in his regiment, after a while in his brigade. When Ball’s Bluff and Bull Run succeeded the utter failure of the Peninsular campaign, when the terrible defeat of Fredericksburg was followed by the scarcely less disastrous day at Chancellorsville he did not announce (if he had any pluck or manliness about him) that he considered it quite useless for any self-respecting citizen to enter the Army of the Potomac, because he really was not of much weight in its councils, and did not approve of its management; he simply gritted his teeth and went doggedly on with his duty, grieving over, but not disheartened at the innumerable shortcomings and follies committed by those who helped to guide the destinies of the army, recognizing also the bravery, the patience, intelligence, and resolution with which other men in high places offset the follies and shortcomings and persevering with equal mind through triumph and defeat until finally he saw the tide of failure turn at Gettysburg and the full flood of victory come with Appomattox. I do wish that more of our good citizens would go into politics, and would do it in the same spirit with which their fathers went into the Federal armies. Begin with the little thing, and do not expect to accomplish anything without an effort. Of course, if you go to a primary just once, never having taken the trouble to know any of the other people who go there you will find yourself wholly out of place; but if you keep on attending and try to form associations with other men whom you meet at the political gatherings, or whom you can persuade to attend them, you will very soon find yourself a weight. In the same way, if a man feels that the politics of his city, for instance, are very corrupt and wants to reform them, it would be an excellent idea for him to begin with his district. If he Joins with other people, who think as he does, to form a club where abstract political virtue will be discussed he may do a great deal of good. We need such clubs; but he must also get to know his own ward or his own district, put himself in communication with the decent people in that district, of whom we may rest assured there will be many, willing and able to do something practical for the procurance of better government Let him set to work to procure a better assemblyman or better alderman before he tries his hand at making a mayor, a governor, or a president. If he begins at the top he may make a brilliant temporary success, but the chances are a thousand to one that he will only be defeated eventually; and in no event will the good he does stand on the same broad and permanent foundation as if he had begun at the bottom. Of course, one or two of his efforts may be failures; but if he has the right stuff in him he will go ahead and do his duty irrespective of whether he meets with success or defeat. It is perfectly right to consider the question of failure while shaping one’s efforts to succeed in the struggle for the right; but there should be no consideration of it whatsoever when the question is as to whether one should or should not make a struggle for the right. When once a band of one hundred and fifty or two hundred honest, intelligent men, who mean business and know their business, is found in any district, whether in one of the regular organizations or outside, you can guarantee that the local politicians of that district will begin to treat it with a combination of fear, hatred, and respect, and that its influence will be felt; and that while sometimes men will be elected to office in direct defiance of its wishes, more often the successful candidates will feel that they have to pay some regard to its demands for public decency and honesty. “Duties of American Citizenship” – Questions (Please answer on a separate piece of paper and submit it through Blackboard) 1.  Are you able to identify any idiomatic collocations in this speech?  What purpose do they serve?  Are they effective? 2.  As I mentioned in the introduction, some idea promoted in this speech may seem outdated.  Can you identify anything that doesn’t seem to fit with modern life?  Anything that seems inappropriate? 3.  Although this is an excerpt and not the entire speech, go through the part given here a outline the basic ideas.  The outline should be organized by paragraph in the following fashion: Paragraph 1:             Idea 1             Example             Point             Idea 2 Paragraph 2: 4.  In your own words, summarize the speech.  What is he saying?  How is he saying it? 5.  Do you think this is a good speech?  Is it effective? 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EAP 500 – English for Academic Purposes   Below is an excerpt from a speech by a former US president, Theodore Roosevelt about what it means to be an American citizen.  Some parts of this text may pro                                                         EAP 500 – English for Academic Purposes  Below is an excerpt from a speech by a former US president, Theodore Roosevelt about what it means to be an American citizen.  Some parts of this text may promote ideas seem antediluvian to us today.  Read through the excerpt and answer the questions that follow.  “Duties of American Citizenship” by Theodore Roosevelt  Buffalo, New York, January 26, 1883  Of course, in one sense, the first essential for a man’s being a good citizen is his possession of the home virtues of which we think when we call a man by the emphatic adjective of manly. No man can be a good citizen who is not a good husband and a good father, who is not honest in his dealings with other men and women, faithful to his friends and fearless in the presence of his foes, who has not got a sound heart, a sound mind, and a sound body; exactly as no amount of attention to civil duties will save a nation if the domestic life is undermined, or there is lack of the rude military virtues which alone can assure a country’s position in the world. In a free republic the ideal citizen must be one willing and able to take arms for the defense of the flag, exactly as the ideal citizen must be the father of many healthy children. A race must be strong and vigorous; it must be a race of good fighters and good breeders, else its wisdom will come to naught and its virtue be ineffective; and no sweetness and delicacy, no love for and appreciation of beauty in art or literature, no capacity for building up material prosperity can possibly atone for the lack of the great virile virtues.  But this is aside from my subject, for what I wish to talk of is the attitude of the American citizen in civic life. It ought to be axiomatic in this country that every man must devote a reasonable share of his time to doing his duty in the Political life of the community. No man has a right to shirk his political duties under whatever plea of pleasure or business; and while such shirking may be pardoned in those of small cleans it is entirely unpardonable in those among whom it is most common–in the people whose circumstances give them freedom in the struggle for life. In so far as the community grows to think rightly, it will likewise grow to regard the young man of means who shirks his duty to the State in time of peace as being only one degree worse than the man who thus shirks it in time of war. A great many of our men in business, or of our young men who are bent on enjoying life (as they have a perfect right to do if only they do not sacrifice other things to enjoyment), rather plume themselves upon being good citizens if they even vote; yet voting is the very least of their duties, Nothing worth gaining is ever gained without effort. You can no more have freedom without striving and suffering for it than you can win success as a banker or a lawyer without labor and effort, without self-denial in youth and the display of a ready and alert intelligence in middle age. The people who say that they have not time to attend to politics are simply saying that they are unfit to live in a free community. Their place is under a despotism; or if they are content to do nothing but vote, you can take despotism tempered by an occasional plebiscite, like that of the second Napoleon. In one of Lowell’s magnificent stanzas about the Civil War he speaks of the fact which his countrymen were then learning, that freedom is not a gift that tarries long in the hands of cowards: nor yet does it tarry long in the hands of the sluggard and the idler, in the hands of the man so much absorbed in the pursuit of pleasure or in the pursuit of gain, or so much wrapped up in his own easy home life as to be unable to take his part in the rough struggle with his fellow men for political supremacy. If freedom is worth having, if the right of self-government is a valuable right, then the one and the other must be retained exactly as our forefathers acquired them, by labor, and especially by labor in organization, that is in combination with our fellows who have the same interests and the same principles. We should not accept the excuse of the business man who attributed his failure to the fact that his social duties were so pleasant and engrossing that he had no time left for work in his office; nor would we pay much heed to his further statement that he did not like business anyhow because he thought the morals of the business community by no means what they should be, and saw that the great successes were most often won by men of the Jay Gould stamp. It is just the same way with politics. It makes one feel half angry and half amused, and wholly contemptuous, to find men of high business or social standing in the community saying that they really have not got time to go to ward meetings, to organize political clubs, and to take a personal share in all the important details of practical politics; men who further urge against their going the fact that they think the condition of political morality low, and are afraid that they may be required to do what is not right if they go into politics.  The first duty of an American citizen, then, is that he shall work in politics; his second duty is that he shall do that work in a practical manner; and his third is that it shall be done in accord with the highest principles of honor and justice. Of course, it is not possible to define rigidly just the way in which the work shall be made practical. Each man’s individual temper and convictions must be taken into account. To a certain extent his work must be done in accordance with his individual beliefs and theories of right and wrong. To a yet greater extent it must be done in combination with others, he yielding or modifying certain of his own theories and beliefs so as to enable him to stand on a common ground with his fellows, who have likewise yielded or modified certain of their theories and beliefs. There is no need of dogmatizing about independence on the one hand or party allegiance on the other. There are occasions when it may be the highest duty of any man to act outside of parties and against the one with which he has himself been hitherto identified; and there may be many more occasions when his highest duty is to sacrifice some of his own cherished opinions for the sake of the success of the party which he on the whole believes to be right. I do not think that the average citizen, at least in one of our great cities, can very well manage to support his own party all the time on every issue, local and otherwise; at any rate if he can do so he has been more fortunately placed than I have been. On the other hand, I am fully convinced that to do the best work people must be organized; and of course an organization is really a party, whether it be a great organization covering the whole nation and numbering its millions of adherents, or an association of citizens in a particular locality, banded together to win a certain specific victory, as, for instance, that of municipal reform. Somebody has said that a racing-yacht, like a good rifle, is a bundle of incompatibilities; that you must get the utmost possible sail power without sacrificing some other quality if you really do get the utmost sail power, that, in short you have got to make more or less of a compromise on each in order to acquire the dozen things needful; but, of course, in making this compromise you must be very careful for the sake of something unimportant not to sacrifice any of the great principles of successful naval architecture. Well, it is about so with a man’s political work. He has got to preserve his independence on the one hand; and on the other, unless he wishes to be a wholly ineffective crank, he has got to have some sense of party allegiance and party responsibility, and he has got to realize that in any given exigency it may be a matter of duty to sacrifice one quality, or it may be a matter of duty to sacrifice the other.  If it is difficult to lay down any fixed rules for party action in the abstract; it would, of course, be wholly impossible to lay them down for party action in the concrete, with reference to the organizations of the present day. I think that we ought to be broad-minded enough to recognize the fact that a good citizen, striving with fearlessness, honesty, and common sense to do his best for the nation, can render service to it in many different ways, and by connection with many different organizations. It is well for a man if he is able conscientiously to feel that his views on the great questions of the day, on such questions as the tariff, finance, immigration, the regulation of the liquor traffic, and others like them, are such as to put him in accord with the bulk of those of his fellow citizens who compose one of the greatest parties: but it is perfectly supposable that he may feel so strongly for or against certain principles held by one party, or certain principles held by the other, that he is unable to give his full adherence to either. In such a case I feel that he has no right to plead this lack of agreement with either party as an excuse for refraining from active political work prior to election. It will, of course, bar him from the primaries of the two leading parties, and preclude him from doing his share in organizing their management; but, unless he is very unfortunate, he can surely find a number of men who are in the same position as himself and who agree with him on some specific piece of political work, and they can turn in practically and effectively long before election to try to do this new piece of work in a practical manner.  One seemingly very necessary caution to utter is, that a man who goes into politics should not expect to reform everything right off, with a jump. I know many excellent young men who, when awakened to the fact that they have neglected their political duties, feel an immediate impulse to form themselves into an organization which shall forthwith purify politics everywhere, national, State, and city alike; and I know of a man who having gone round once to a primary, and having, of course, been unable to accomplish anything in a place where he knew no one and could not combine with anyone, returned saying it was quite useless for a good citizen to try to accomplish anything in such a manner. To these too hopeful or too easily discouraged people I always feel like reading Artemus Ward’s article upon the people of his town who came together in a meeting to resolve that the town should support the Union and the Civil War, but were unwilling to take any part in putting down the rebellion unless they could go as brigadier-generals. After the battle of Bull Run there were a good many hundreds of thousands of young men in the North who felt it to be their duty to enter the Northern armies; but no one of them who possessed much intelligence expected to take high place at the outset, or anticipated that individual action would be of decisive importance in any given campaign. He went in as private or sergeant, lieutenant or captain, as the case might be, and did his duty in his company, in his regiment, after a while in his brigade. When Ball’s Bluff and Bull Run succeeded the utter failure of the Peninsular campaign, when the terrible defeat of Fredericksburg was followed by the scarcely less disastrous day at Chancellorsville he did not announce (if he had any pluck or manliness about him) that he considered it quite useless for any self-respecting citizen to enter the Army of the Potomac, because he really was not of much weight in its councils, and did not approve of its management; he simply gritted his teeth and went doggedly on with his duty, grieving over, but not disheartened at the innumerable shortcomings and follies committed by those who helped to guide the destinies of the army, recognizing also the bravery, the patience, intelligence, and resolution with which other men in high places offset the follies and shortcomings and persevering with equal mind through triumph and defeat until finally he saw the tide of failure turn at Gettysburg and the full flood of victory come with Appomattox.  I do wish that more of our good citizens would go into politics, and would do it in the same spirit with which their fathers went into the Federal armies. Begin with the little thing, and do not expect to accomplish anything without an effort. Of course, if you go to a primary just once, never having taken the trouble to know any of the other people who go there you will find yourself wholly out of place; but if you keep on attending and try to form associations with other men whom you meet at the political gatherings, or whom you can persuade to attend them, you will very soon find yourself a weight. In the same way, if a man feels that the politics of his city, for instance, are very corrupt and wants to reform them, it would be an excellent idea for him to begin with his district. If he Joins with other people, who think as he does, to form a club where abstract political virtue will be discussed he may do a great deal of good. We need such clubs; but he must also get to know his own ward or his own district, put himself in communication with the decent people in that district, of whom we may rest assured there will be many, willing and able to do something practical for the procurance of better government Let him set to work to procure a better assemblyman or better alderman before he tries his hand at making a mayor, a governor, or a president. If he begins at the top he may make a brilliant temporary success, but the chances are a thousand to one that he will only be defeated eventually; and in no event will the good he does stand on the same broad and permanent foundation as if he had begun at the bottom. Of course, one or two of his efforts may be failures; but if he has the right stuff in him he will go ahead and do his duty irrespective of whether he meets with success or defeat. It is perfectly right to consider the question of failure while shaping one’s efforts to succeed in the struggle for the right; but there should be no consideration of it whatsoever when the question is as to whether one should or should not make a struggle for the right. When once a band of one hundred and fifty or two hundred honest, intelligent men, who mean business and know their business, is found in any district, whether in one of the regular organizations or outside, you can guarantee that the local politicians of that district will begin to treat it with a combination of fear, hatred, and respect, and that its influence will be felt; and that while sometimes men will be elected to office in direct defiance of its wishes, more often the successful candidates will feel that they have to pay some regard to its demands for public decency and honesty.  “Duties of American Citizenship” – Questions (Please answer on a separate piece of paper and submit it through Blackboard)  1.  Are you able to identify any idiomatic collocations in this speech?  What purpose do they serve?  Are they effective?  2.  As I mentioned in the introduction, some idea promoted in this speech may seem outdated.  Can you identify anything that doesn’t seem to fit with modern life?  Anything that seems inappropriate?  3.  Although this is an excerpt and not the entire speech, go through the part given here a outline the basic ideas.  The outline should be organized by paragraph in the following fashion:  Paragraph 1:              Idea 1              Example              Point              Idea 2  Paragraph 2:  4.  In your own words, summarize the speech.  What is he saying?  How is he saying it?  5.  Do you think this is a good speech?  Is it effective?                                                    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EAP 500 – English for Academic Purposes

Below is an excerpt from a speech by a former US president, Theodore Roosevelt about what it means to be an American citizen.  Some parts of this text may promote ideas seem antediluvian to us today.  Read through the excerpt and answer the questions that follow.

“Duties of American Citizenship” by Theodore Roosevelt

Buffalo, New York, January 26, 1883

Of course, in one sense, the first essential for a man’s being a good citizen is his possession of the home virtues of which we think when we call a man by the emphatic adjective of manly. No man can be a good citizen who is not a good husband and a good father, who is not honest in his dealings with other men and women, faithful to his friends and fearless in the presence of his foes, who has not got a sound heart, a sound mind, and a sound body; exactly as no amount of attention to civil duties will save a nation if the domestic life is undermined, or there is lack of the rude military virtues which alone can assure a country’s position in the world. In a free republic the ideal citizen must be one willing and able to take arms for the defense of the flag, exactly as the ideal citizen must be the father of many healthy children. A race must be strong and vigorous; it must be a race of good fighters and good breeders, else its wisdom will come to naught and its virtue be ineffective; and no sweetness and delicacy, no love for and appreciation of beauty in art or literature, no capacity for building up material prosperity can possibly atone for the lack of the great virile virtues.

But this is aside from my subject, for what I wish to talk of is the attitude of the American citizen in civic life. It ought to be axiomatic in this country that every man must devote a reasonable share of his time to doing his duty in the Political life of the community. No man has a right to shirk his political duties under whatever plea of pleasure or business; and while such shirking may be pardoned in those of small cleans it is entirely unpardonable in those among whom it is most common–in the people whose circumstances give them freedom in the struggle for life. In so far as the community grows to think rightly, it will likewise grow to regard the young man of means who shirks his duty to the State in time of peace as being only one degree worse than the man who thus shirks it in time of war. A great many of our men in business, or of our young men who are bent on enjoying life (as they have a perfect right to do if only they do not sacrifice other things to enjoyment), rather plume themselves upon being good citizens if they even vote; yet voting is the very least of their duties, Nothing worth gaining is ever gained without effort. You can no more have freedom without striving and suffering for it than you can win success as a banker or a lawyer without labor and effort, without self-denial in youth and the display of a ready and alert intelligence in middle age. The people who say that they have not time to attend to politics are simply saying that they are unfit to live in a free community. Their place is under a despotism; or if they are content to do nothing but vote, you can take despotism tempered by an occasional plebiscite, like that of the second Napoleon. In one of Lowell’s magnificent stanzas about the Civil War he speaks of the fact which his countrymen were then learning, that freedom is not a gift that tarries long in the hands of cowards: nor yet does it tarry long in the hands of the sluggard and the idler, in the hands of the man so much absorbed in the pursuit of pleasure or in the pursuit of gain, or so much wrapped up in his own easy home life as to be unable to take his part in the rough struggle with his fellow men for political supremacy. If freedom is worth having, if the right of self-government is a valuable right, then the one and the other must be retained exactly as our forefathers acquired them, by labor, and especially by labor in organization, that is in combination with our fellows who have the same interests and the same principles. We should not accept the excuse of the business man who attributed his failure to the fact that his social duties were so pleasant and engrossing that he had no time left for work in his office; nor would we pay much heed to his further statement that he did not like business anyhow because he thought the morals of the business community by no means what they should be, and saw that the great successes were most often won by men of the Jay Gould stamp. It is just the same way with politics. It makes one feel half angry and half amused, and wholly contemptuous, to find men of high business or social standing in the community saying that they really have not got time to go to ward meetings, to organize political clubs, and to take a personal share in all the important details of practical politics; men who further urge against their going the fact that they think the condition of political morality low, and are afraid that they may be required to do what is not right if they go into politics.

The first duty of an American citizen, then, is that he shall work in politics; his second duty is that he shall do that work in a practical manner; and his third is that it shall be done in accord with the highest principles of honor and justice. Of course, it is not possible to define rigidly just the way in which the work shall be made practical. Each man’s individual temper and convictions must be taken into account. To a certain extent his work must be done in accordance with his individual beliefs and theories of right and wrong. To a yet greater extent it must be done in combination with others, he yielding or modifying certain of his own theories and beliefs so as to enable him to stand on a common ground with his fellows, who have likewise yielded or modified certain of their theories and beliefs. There is no need of dogmatizing about independence on the one hand or party allegiance on the other. There are occasions when it may be the highest duty of any man to act outside of parties and against the one with which he has himself been hitherto identified; and there may be many more occasions when his highest duty is to sacrifice some of his own cherished opinions for the sake of the success of the party which he on the whole believes to be right. I do not think that the average citizen, at least in one of our great cities, can very well manage to support his own party all the time on every issue, local and otherwise; at any rate if he can do so he has been more fortunately placed than I have been. On the other hand, I am fully convinced that to do the best work people must be organized; and of course an organization is really a party, whether it be a great organization covering the whole nation and numbering its millions of adherents, or an association of citizens in a particular locality, banded together to win a certain specific victory, as, for instance, that of municipal reform. Somebody has said that a racing-yacht, like a good rifle, is a bundle of incompatibilities; that you must get the utmost possible sail power without sacrificing some other quality if you really do get the utmost sail power, that, in short you have got to make more or less of a compromise on each in order to acquire the dozen things needful; but, of course, in making this compromise you must be very careful for the sake of something unimportant not to sacrifice any of the great principles of successful naval architecture. Well, it is about so with a man’s political work. He has got to preserve his independence on the one hand; and on the other, unless he wishes to be a wholly ineffective crank, he has got to have some sense of party allegiance and party responsibility, and he has got to realize that in any given exigency it may be a matter of duty to sacrifice one quality, or it may be a matter of duty to sacrifice the other.

If it is difficult to lay down any fixed rules for party action in the abstract; it would, of course, be wholly impossible to lay them down for party action in the concrete, with reference to the organizations of the present day. I think that we ought to be broad-minded enough to recognize the fact that a good citizen, striving with fearlessness, honesty, and common sense to do his best for the nation, can render service to it in many different ways, and by connection with many different organizations. It is well for a man if he is able conscientiously to feel that his views on the great questions of the day, on such questions as the tariff, finance, immigration, the regulation of the liquor traffic, and others like them, are such as to put him in accord with the bulk of those of his fellow citizens who compose one of the greatest parties: but it is perfectly supposable that he may feel so strongly for or against certain principles held by one party, or certain principles held by the other, that he is unable to give his full adherence to either. In such a case I feel that he has no right to plead this lack of agreement with either party as an excuse for refraining from active political work prior to election. It will, of course, bar him from the primaries of the two leading parties, and preclude him from doing his share in organizing their management; but, unless he is very unfortunate, he can surely find a number of men who are in the same position as himself and who agree with him on some specific piece of political work, and they can turn in practically and effectively long before election to try to do this new piece of work in a practical manner.

One seemingly very necessary caution to utter is, that a man who goes into politics should not expect to reform everything right off, with a jump. I know many excellent young men who, when awakened to the fact that they have neglected their political duties, feel an immediate impulse to form themselves into an organization which shall forthwith purify politics everywhere, national, State, and city alike; and I know of a man who having gone round once to a primary, and having, of course, been unable to accomplish anything in a place where he knew no one and could not combine with anyone, returned saying it was quite useless for a good citizen to try to accomplish anything in such a manner. To these too hopeful or too easily discouraged people I always feel like reading Artemus Ward’s article upon the people of his town who came together in a meeting to resolve that the town should support the Union and the Civil War, but were unwilling to take any part in putting down the rebellion unless they could go as brigadier-generals. After the battle of Bull Run there were a good many hundreds of thousands of young men in the North who felt it to be their duty to enter the Northern armies; but no one of them who possessed much intelligence expected to take high place at the outset, or anticipated that individual action would be of decisive importance in any given campaign. He went in as private or sergeant, lieutenant or captain, as the case might be, and did his duty in his company, in his regiment, after a while in his brigade. When Ball’s Bluff and Bull Run succeeded the utter failure of the Peninsular campaign, when the terrible defeat of Fredericksburg was followed by the scarcely less disastrous day at Chancellorsville he did not announce (if he had any pluck or manliness about him) that he considered it quite useless for any self-respecting citizen to enter the Army of the Potomac, because he really was not of much weight in its councils, and did not approve of its management; he simply gritted his teeth and went doggedly on with his duty, grieving over, but not disheartened at the innumerable shortcomings and follies committed by those who helped to guide the destinies of the army, recognizing also the bravery, the patience, intelligence, and resolution with which other men in high places offset the follies and shortcomings and persevering with equal mind through triumph and defeat until finally he saw the tide of failure turn at Gettysburg and the full flood of victory come with Appomattox.

I do wish that more of our good citizens would go into politics, and would do it in the same spirit with which their fathers went into the Federal armies. Begin with the little thing, and do not expect to accomplish anything without an effort. Of course, if you go to a primary just once, never having taken the trouble to know any of the other people who go there you will find yourself wholly out of place; but if you keep on attending and try to form associations with other men whom you meet at the political gatherings, or whom you can persuade to attend them, you will very soon find yourself a weight. In the same way, if a man feels that the politics of his city, for instance, are very corrupt and wants to reform them, it would be an excellent idea for him to begin with his district. If he Joins with other people, who think as he does, to form a club where abstract political virtue will be discussed he may do a great deal of good. We need such clubs; but he must also get to know his own ward or his own district, put himself in communication with the decent people in that district, of whom we may rest assured there will be many, willing and able to do something practical for the procurance of better government Let him set to work to procure a better assemblyman or better alderman before he tries his hand at making a mayor, a governor, or a president. If he begins at the top he may make a brilliant temporary success, but the chances are a thousand to one that he will only be defeated eventually; and in no event will the good he does stand on the same broad and permanent foundation as if he had begun at the bottom. Of course, one or two of his efforts may be failures; but if he has the right stuff in him he will go ahead and do his duty irrespective of whether he meets with success or defeat. It is perfectly right to consider the question of failure while shaping one’s efforts to succeed in the struggle for the right; but there should be no consideration of it whatsoever when the question is as to whether one should or should not make a struggle for the right. When once a band of one hundred and fifty or two hundred honest, intelligent men, who mean business and know their business, is found in any district, whether in one of the regular organizations or outside, you can guarantee that the local politicians of that district will begin to treat it with a combination of fear, hatred, and respect, and that its influence will be felt; and that while sometimes men will be elected to office in direct defiance of its wishes, more often the successful candidates will feel that they have to pay some regard to its demands for public decency and honesty.

“Duties of American Citizenship” – Questions (Please answer on a separate piece of paper and submit it through Blackboard)

1.  Are you able to identify any idiomatic collocations in this speech?  What purpose do they serve?  Are they effective?

2.  As I mentioned in the introduction, some idea promoted in this speech may seem outdated.  Can you identify anything that doesn’t seem to fit with modern life?  Anything that seems inappropriate?

3.  Although this is an excerpt and not the entire speech, go through the part given here a outline the basic ideas.  The outline should be organized by paragraph in the following fashion:

Paragraph 1:

            Idea 1

            Example

            Point

            Idea 2

Paragraph 2:

4.  In your own words, summarize the speech.  What is he saying?  How is he saying it?

5.  Do you think this is a good speech?  Is it effective?

Choose a 10-12-page article not including references .The article must come from an Academic journal. In your Article Review you should describe the content of the article chosen, identifying key ass Choose a 10-12-page article not including references .The article must come from an Academic journal.  In your Article Review you should describe the content of the article chosen, identifying key assumptions and conclusions of the authors and giving your opinion on them. Your analysis should lead to a justified conclusion: whether you will recommend this article to your colleagues and classmates or not and why. You also need to briefly assess relevance/applicability of the concepts of the article in both overall business settings and personal work settings. Requirements: ● Your Article Review should be no less than 1000 wordsusing APA. Show more

Choose a 10-12-page article not including references .The article must come from an Academic journal.  In your Article Review you should describe the content of the article chosen, identifying key ass                                                         Choose a 10-12-page article not including references .The article must come from an Academic journal.   In your Article Review you should describe the content of the article chosen, identifying key assumptions and conclusions of the authors and giving your opinion on them. Your analysis should lead to a justified conclusion: whether you will recommend this article to your colleagues and classmates or not and why. You also need to briefly assess relevance/applicability of the concepts of the article in both overall business settings and personal work settings.  Requirements:  ● Your Article Review should be no less than 1000 wordsusing APA.                                                    Show more

Choose a 10-12-page article not including references .The article must come from an Academic journal. 

In your Article Review you should describe the content of the article chosen, identifying key assumptions and conclusions of the authors and giving your opinion on them. Your analysis should lead to a justified conclusion: whether you will recommend this article to your colleagues and classmates or not and why. You also need to briefly assess relevance/applicability of the concepts of the article in both overall business settings and personal work settings.

Requirements:

● Your Article Review should be no less than 1000 wordsusing APA.

POL: Analysis of Poem Dulce et Decorum Est Launch Audio in a New Window BY WILFRED OWEN Bent double, like old beggars under sacks, Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge, Till on POL: Analysis of Poem  Dulce et Decorum Est  Launch Audio in a New Window BY WILFRED OWEN Bent double, like old beggars under sacks, Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge, Till on the haunting flares we turned our backs, And towards our distant rest began to trudge. Men marched asleep. Many had lost their boots, But limped on, blood-shod. All went lame; all blind; Drunk with fatigue; deaf even to the hoots Of gas-shells dropping softly behind. Gas! GAS! Quick, boys!—An ecstasy of fumbling Fitting the clumsy helmets just in time, But someone still was yelling out and stumbling And flound’ring like a man in fire or lime.— Dim through the misty panes and thick green light, As under a green sea, I saw him drowning. In all my dreams before my helpless sight, He plunges at me, guttering, choking, drowning. If in some smothering dreams, you too could pace Behind the wagon that we flung him in, And watch the white eyes writhing in his face, His hanging face, like a devil’s sick of sin; If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs, Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues,— My friend, you would not tell with such high zest To children ardent for some desperate glory, The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est Pro patria mori. Notes: Latin phrase is from the Roman poet Horace: “It is sweet and fitting to die for one’s country.” Directions: When you are asked to provide the chunks of your poem, make sure you provide all of them. For the purpose of this activity, do not use more than four lines for a chunk. 1. Poetry Exploration: Syntax (5) Directions: Take the poem you are memorizing for POL and divide it by chunks using syntax. Type / copy each chunk on a line. Pay particular attention to where punctuation is, so as to pause appropriately. Re-write your poem based on those chunks/pauses. 2. Poetry Exploration: Imagery (5) Directions: Identify every image in your poem. Write the phrase in the appropriate category. 7 choices in each one Visual Auditory Gustatory Tactile Olfactory 3. Poetry Exploration: Title (5) For #1 indicate the prediction you made with the title. If your poem is a sonnet which uses the first line as the little, work with the first line.  For #2, indicate what the poem actually ended up being about. For #3, explain why the title is appropriate for the poem.  4.Poetry Exploration: Speaker/Situation  (5)  Explain in a sentence who the speaker of the poem is.   Next, pull some line/phrase/idea from the poem that supports your assertion of who the speaker is.  Finally, in one sentence, explain the situation that requires the writing of this poem. What has the speaker experienced to make him/her/it write this poem? Speaker: How I know:  Situation: 5. Poetry Exploration: Denotation  (5) Directions: Define all the words you do not know in your poem. Do NOT use the root of a word to define itself. Use the definition that is appropriate for the poem. If you know the definition of every single word, then choose 4 words that are the most challenging vocabulary and provide that definition. INCLUDE any word you do not know how to say.  6. Poetry Exploration: Connotation- All the thoughts, feelings, words, cultural associations, extended definition of a word.(10) Directions: Copy/paste your POL poem divided by chunks on the left side. In the middle column, identify the MOST important word in the chunk and type that word. To determine the most important word, ask yourself which word makes a difference to the meaning or more of an impact on meaning. Once you have identified the most impactful word in the chunk, spend time writing all of the connotations you have with the word.  Eventually, you will begin to notice a pattern of the same type of connotations emerging from the poem. Note – when working with this step for class, work to identify a minimum of 10 total words in your poem. If you have fewer than 10 chunks, you may have to choose more than one important word for connotation. If you have more than 10 chunks, make sure you work with each chunk. 7. Poetry Exploration: Summary/Paraphrase (5) Directions: You should already have your poem for POL divided by syntactical units/chunks. In the table below, copy your poem one chunk at a time on the left-hand column. On the right-hand column, summarize or paraphrase what is happening for that chunk or what the meaning is of that chunk.  8. Poetry Exploration: Figurative Language (5) Directions: Identify ALL of the figurative language/metaphor umbrella used in your poem. You may refer to the Metaphors and Meaning handout for your list of figurative language.   On the left hand column insert every single chunk of your poem.  In the next column write N/A if there is not any figurative language. If there is figurative language, identify the type.  In the next column write a sentence saying what is being compared to what.  In the final column, write a sentence explaining the significance of the comparison. Explain what more you understand with the comparison. POEM CHUNK METAPHOR UMBRELLA WHAT IS BEING COMPARED TO WHAT SIGNIFICANCE OF COMPARISON POL: Tone Analysis of Poem (5) Directions: Use the provided tone lists in the Poetry section of Classroom to determine the tone that is appropriate for each syntactic unit/chunk. Highlight where you see the major shift in the poem. Remember that a shift in tone can be complementary or contrasting. You must choose a specific tone word. You may not choose a general category.  Syntactic Unit / Chunk from Poem The tone you will use in delivery of chunk Show more

POL: Analysis of Poem  Dulce et Decorum Est  Launch Audio in a New Window BY WILFRED OWEN Bent double, like old beggars under sacks, Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge, Till on                                                         POL: Analysis of Poem   Dulce et Decorum Est   Launch Audio in a New Window  BY WILFRED OWEN  Bent double, like old beggars under sacks,  Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge,  Till on the haunting flares we turned our backs,  And towards our distant rest began to trudge.  Men marched asleep. Many had lost their boots,  But limped on, blood-shod. All went lame; all blind;  Drunk with fatigue; deaf even to the hoots  Of gas-shells dropping softly behind.  Gas! GAS! Quick, boys!—An ecstasy of fumbling  Fitting the clumsy helmets just in time,  But someone still was yelling out and stumbling  And flound’ring like a man in fire or lime.—  Dim through the misty panes and thick green light,  As under a green sea, I saw him drowning.  In all my dreams before my helpless sight,  He plunges at me, guttering, choking, drowning.  If in some smothering dreams, you too could pace  Behind the wagon that we flung him in,  And watch the white eyes writhing in his face,  His hanging face, like a devil’s sick of sin;  If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood  Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs,  Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud  Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues,—  My friend, you would not tell with such high zest  To children ardent for some desperate glory,  The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est  Pro patria mori.  Notes:  Latin phrase is from the Roman poet Horace: “It is sweet and fitting to die for one’s country.”  Directions: When you are asked to provide the chunks of your poem, make sure you provide all of them. For the purpose of this activity, do not use more than four lines for a chunk.  1. Poetry Exploration: Syntax (5)  Directions: Take the poem you are memorizing for POL and divide it by chunks using syntax. Type / copy each chunk on a line. Pay particular attention to where punctuation is, so as to pause appropriately. Re-write your poem based on those chunks/pauses.  2. Poetry Exploration: Imagery (5)  Directions: Identify every image in your poem. Write the phrase in the appropriate category. 7 choices in each one  Visual  Auditory  Gustatory  Tactile  Olfactory  3. Poetry Exploration: Title (5)  For #1 indicate the prediction you made with the title. If your poem is a sonnet which uses the first line as the little, work with the first line.   For #2, indicate what the poem actually ended up being about.  For #3, explain why the title is appropriate for the poem.   4.Poetry Exploration: Speaker/Situation  (5)   Explain in a sentence who the speaker of the poem is.    Next, pull some line/phrase/idea from the poem that supports your assertion of who the speaker is.   Finally, in one sentence, explain the situation that requires the writing of this poem. What has the speaker experienced to make him/her/it write this poem?  Speaker:  How I know:   Situation:  5. Poetry Exploration: Denotation  (5)  Directions: Define all the words you do not know in your poem. Do NOT use the root of a word to define itself. Use the definition that is appropriate for the poem. If you know the definition of every single word, then choose 4 words that are the most challenging vocabulary and provide that definition. INCLUDE any word you do not know how to say.   6. Poetry Exploration: Connotation- All the thoughts, feelings, words, cultural associations, extended definition of a word.(10)  Directions: Copy/paste your POL poem divided by chunks on the left side. In the middle column, identify the MOST important word in the chunk and type that word. To determine the most important word, ask yourself which word makes a difference to the meaning or more of an impact on meaning. Once you have identified the most impactful word in the chunk, spend time writing all of the connotations you have with the word.  Eventually, you will begin to notice a pattern of the same type of connotations emerging from the poem. Note – when working with this step for class, work to identify a minimum of 10 total words in your poem. If you have fewer than 10 chunks, you may have to choose more than one important word for connotation. If you have more than 10 chunks, make sure you work with each chunk.  7. Poetry Exploration: Summary/Paraphrase (5)  Directions: You should already have your poem for POL divided by syntactical units/chunks. In the table below, copy your poem one chunk at a time on the left-hand column. On the right-hand column, summarize or paraphrase what is happening for that chunk or what the meaning is of that chunk.   8. Poetry Exploration: Figurative Language (5)  Directions: Identify ALL of the figurative language/metaphor umbrella used in your poem. You may refer to the Metaphors and Meaning handout for your list of figurative language.    On the left hand column insert every single chunk of your poem.   In the next column write N/A if there is not any figurative language. If there is figurative language, identify the type.   In the next column write a sentence saying what is being compared to what.   In the final column, write a sentence explaining the significance of the comparison. Explain what more you understand with the comparison.  POEM CHUNK  METAPHOR UMBRELLA  WHAT IS BEING COMPARED TO WHAT  SIGNIFICANCE OF COMPARISON  POL: Tone Analysis of Poem (5)  Directions: Use the provided tone lists in the Poetry section of Classroom to determine the tone that is appropriate for each syntactic unit/chunk. Highlight where you see the major shift in the poem. Remember that a shift in tone can be complementary or contrasting. You must choose a specific tone word. You may not choose a general category.   Syntactic Unit / Chunk from Poem  The tone you will use in delivery of chunk                                                    Show more

POL: Analysis of Poem 

Dulce et Decorum Est 

Launch Audio in a New Window

BY WILFRED OWEN

Bent double, like old beggars under sacks,

Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge,

Till on the haunting flares we turned our backs,

And towards our distant rest began to trudge.

Men marched asleep. Many had lost their boots,

But limped on, blood-shod. All went lame; all blind;

Drunk with fatigue; deaf even to the hoots

Of gas-shells dropping softly behind.

Gas! GAS! Quick, boys!—An ecstasy of fumbling

Fitting the clumsy helmets just in time,

But someone still was yelling out and stumbling

And flound’ring like a man in fire or lime.—

Dim through the misty panes and thick green light,

As under a green sea, I saw him drowning.

In all my dreams before my helpless sight,

He plunges at me, guttering, choking, drowning.

If in some smothering dreams, you too could pace

Behind the wagon that we flung him in,

And watch the white eyes writhing in his face,

His hanging face, like a devil’s sick of sin;

If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood

Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs,

Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud

Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues,—

My friend, you would not tell with such high zest

To children ardent for some desperate glory,

The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est

Pro patria mori.

Notes:

Latin phrase is from the Roman poet Horace: “It is sweet and fitting to die for one’s country.”

Directions: When you are asked to provide the chunks of your poem, make sure you provide all of them. For the purpose of this activity, do not use more than four lines for a chunk.

1. Poetry Exploration: Syntax (5)

Directions: Take the poem you are memorizing for POL and divide it by chunks using syntax. Type / copy each chunk on a line. Pay particular attention to where punctuation is, so as to pause appropriately. Re-write your poem based on those chunks/pauses.

2. Poetry Exploration: Imagery (5)

Directions: Identify every image in your poem. Write the phrase in the appropriate category. 7 choices in each one

Visual

Auditory

Gustatory

Tactile

Olfactory

3. Poetry Exploration: Title (5)

For #1 indicate the prediction you made with the title. If your poem is a sonnet which uses the first line as the little, work with the first line. 

For #2, indicate what the poem actually ended up being about.

For #3, explain why the title is appropriate for the poem. 

4.Poetry Exploration: Speaker/Situation  (5)

 Explain in a sentence who the speaker of the poem is.  

Next, pull some line/phrase/idea from the poem that supports your assertion of who the speaker is.

 Finally, in one sentence, explain the situation that requires the writing of this poem. What has the speaker experienced to make him/her/it write this poem?

Speaker:

How I know: 

Situation:

5. Poetry Exploration: Denotation  (5)

Directions: Define all the words you do not know in your poem. Do NOT use the root of a word to define itself. Use the definition that is appropriate for the poem. If you know the definition of every single word, then choose 4 words that are the most challenging vocabulary and provide that definition. INCLUDE any word you do not know how to say. 

6. Poetry Exploration: Connotation- All the thoughts, feelings, words, cultural associations, extended definition of a word.(10)

Directions: Copy/paste your POL poem divided by chunks on the left side. In the middle column, identify the MOST important word in the chunk and type that word. To determine the most important word, ask yourself which word makes a difference to the meaning or more of an impact on meaning. Once you have identified the most impactful word in the chunk, spend time writing all of the connotations you have with the word.  Eventually, you will begin to notice a pattern of the same type of connotations emerging from the poem. Note – when working with this step for class, work to identify a minimum of 10 total words in your poem. If you have fewer than 10 chunks, you may have to choose more than one important word for connotation. If you have more than 10 chunks, make sure you work with each chunk.

7. Poetry Exploration: Summary/Paraphrase (5)

Directions: You should already have your poem for POL divided by syntactical units/chunks. In the table below, copy your poem one chunk at a time on the left-hand column. On the right-hand column, summarize or paraphrase what is happening for that chunk or what the meaning is of that chunk. 

8. Poetry Exploration: Figurative Language (5)

Directions: Identify ALL of the figurative language/metaphor umbrella used in your poem. You may refer to the Metaphors and Meaning handout for your list of figurative language. 

 On the left hand column insert every single chunk of your poem.

 In the next column write N/A if there is not any figurative language. If there is figurative language, identify the type.

 In the next column write a sentence saying what is being compared to what. 

In the final column, write a sentence explaining the significance of the comparison. Explain what more you understand with the comparison.

POEM CHUNK

METAPHOR UMBRELLA

WHAT IS BEING COMPARED TO WHAT

SIGNIFICANCE OF COMPARISON

POL: Tone Analysis of Poem (5)

Directions: Use the provided tone lists in the Poetry section of Classroom to determine the tone that is appropriate for each syntactic unit/chunk. Highlight where you see the major shift in the poem. Remember that a shift in tone can be complementary or contrasting. You must choose a specific tone word. You may not choose a general category. 

Syntactic Unit / Chunk from Poem

The tone you will use in delivery of chunk

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You can either (A) while reading: do 1, and then, while re-reading: do 2 (this will take longer, but will help you really master the material), or (B) while reading: do 1 and 2. I’d recommend doing A for 3.1, and if you really get the hang of this, maybe you can do B when doing the other reading.  Note: 3.1 mentions dualism and physicalism; while it’s nowhere near enough information, it’s a good example of each view’s central claim/thesis. Step 4: Regarding 3.1, organize what you jotted down in the outline. Look for stuff you need that you missed. Cut out stuff you don’t need. Step 5: Textbook: Read “3.2: Dualism” and do the same as in Step 3.  Regarding the separate arguments for Dualism, read all of them, but keep in mind that you may only need one of them (focus on the one you most understand)—you may want to do (1) (from Step 3) for all of the arguments, and then (2) only for argument(s) you choose to include.  Step 6: Regarding “3.2: Dualism,” same as Step 4. Step 7: Check how long the paper looks like it will be at this point.  If you need more content, decide whether you want to either (A) add more arguments for/against dualism, or (B) add physicalism (using “3.3: Physicalism” skipping 234-240 on eliminativism, etc.). While doing A is less reading, the content will start getting harder (e.g., you are now focusing on arguments that weren’t the ones you best understood). Follow the procedures above in Step 3 and Step 4 for A or B. Check how long the paper looks like it will be at this point. If you need more content, do the A or B you didn’t do and/or do more arguments for and against physicalism (following the procedures in Step 3 and Step 4). Step 8: Consider whether you have anything interesting to say about the views, which view is better (if you did both), and/or ideas about your own view. Step 9: Write Conclusion Step 10: Write Introduction Step 11: Proofread and make revisions Essay Prompts (from option 2): Ethics Explain the divine command theory. Does divine command theory make philosophical ethics obsolete? Why (not)? Explain the Euthyphro Problem. Explain the ethical theory of utilitarianism. How did the utilitarianism of Jeremy Bentham and John Stuart Mill differ? Which do you think is better (defend your answer)? How does Alastair Norcross argue for consequentialism in “Comparing Harms: Headaches and Human Lives”? How might someone criticize his argument? Do you agree with that criticism (defend your answer)? Explain what a hypothetical imperative is. Explain what a categorical imperative is. Why does Kant think that morality must consist of categorical imperatives? What does universalizability mean to Kant? What role does universalizability play in Kant’s ethical theory? Give examples. Do you think universalizability is important (defend your answer)? What are the two versions of Kant’s categorical imperative discussed in your text? How does a categorical imperative differ from a hypothetical imperative? Give some examples of how Kant would show that the categorical imperative provides ethical guidance in concrete circumstances. What does Kant mean by the “good will”? Why is it so important to his ethical theory? Why does he think that neither consequences nor inclinations should play a role in ethics? Do you agree with Kant (defend your answer)? Which of the following two people—Cold Colleen or Heartfelt Heather (see lecture slides)—best illustrates what it means to be a genuinely moral person (defend your answer with reasons)? What does Kant believe? Why? What does being an absolutist mean in ethics? Identify ways in which Kant is an absolutist? Do you agree or disagree with absolutism (defend your answer)? What criticisms does virtue ethics make of utilitarianism and Kantian ethics? Do you agree with these criticisms (defend your answer)? Show more

p.p1 {margin: 18.0px 0.0px 6.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Times} p.p2 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Times} p.p3 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 18.0px; font: 12.0px Times; min-height: 14.0px} p                                                         p.p1 {margin: 18.0px 0.0px 6.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Times} p.p2 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Times} p.p3 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 18.0px; font: 12.0px Times; min-height: 14.0px} p.p4 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 10.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Times} p.p5 {margin: 18.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Times} p.p6 {margin: 18.0px 0.0px 12.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Times} p.p7 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Times; min-height: 14.0px} p.p8 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 18.0px 0.0px; text-align: center; font: 12.0px Times} p.p9 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 12.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Times} p.p10 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 36.0px; font: 12.0px Times} p.p11 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 12.0px 36.0px; font: 12.0px Times} p.p12 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 12.0px 55.0px; font: 12.0px Times} li.li2 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Times} li.li4 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 10.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Times} span.s1 {text-decoration: underline} ul.ul1 {list-style-type: disc}  Paper Types:  COVER PAGE & BLIND REVIEW  FORMATTING STYLE:  Sources:  RESOURCES:  Example of OPTIONAL Procedure & Outline (for Dualism or/versus Physicalism)  Step 1: Read the relevant lecture slides (activate your memory regarding this stuff)  Step 2: Read the Outline (so you know what to look for in the textbook)   Introduction [work on this last]  Background/Context  Dualism  Optional: Physicalism  Optional: Your Assessment  Conclusion [work on this 2nd to last]   Step 3: Textbook, read “3.1: Overview: The Mind-Body Problem”  As you read: (1) highlight with the outline in mind, and (2) jot notes in the outline (i.e., start filling in the outline; don’t worry about writing style or anything like that yet). You can either (A) while reading: do 1, and then, while re-reading: do 2 (this will take longer, but will help you really master the material), or (B) while reading: do 1 and 2. I’d recommend doing A for 3.1, and if you really get the hang of this, maybe you can do B when doing the other reading.   Note: 3.1 mentions dualism and physicalism; while it’s nowhere near enough information, it’s a good example of each view’s central claim/thesis.  Step 4: Regarding 3.1, organize what you jotted down in the outline. Look for stuff you need that you missed. Cut out stuff you don’t need.  Step 5: Textbook: Read “3.2: Dualism” and do the same as in Step 3.   Regarding the separate arguments for Dualism, read all of them, but keep in mind that you may only need one of them (focus on the one you most understand)—you may want to do (1) (from Step 3) for all of the arguments, and then (2) only for argument(s) you choose to include.   Step 6: Regarding “3.2: Dualism,” same as Step 4.  Step 7: Check how long the paper looks like it will be at this point.   If you need more content, decide whether you want to either (A) add more arguments for/against dualism, or (B) add physicalism (using “3.3: Physicalism” skipping 234-240 on eliminativism, etc.). While doing A is less reading, the content will start getting harder (e.g., you are now focusing on arguments that weren’t the ones you best understood). Follow the procedures above in Step 3 and Step 4 for A or B. Check how long the paper looks like it will be at this point. If you need more content, do the A or B you didn’t do and/or do more arguments for and against physicalism (following the procedures in Step 3 and Step 4).  Step 8: Consider whether you have anything interesting to say about the views, which view is better (if you did both), and/or ideas about your own view.  Step 9: Write Conclusion  Step 10: Write Introduction  Step 11: Proofread and make revisions  Essay Prompts (from option 2):  Ethics   Explain the divine command theory. Does divine command theory make philosophical ethics obsolete? Why (not)?  Explain the Euthyphro Problem.  Explain the ethical theory of utilitarianism. How did the utilitarianism of Jeremy Bentham and John Stuart Mill differ? Which do you think is better (defend your answer)?  How does Alastair Norcross argue for consequentialism in “Comparing Harms: Headaches and Human Lives”? How might someone criticize his argument? Do you agree with that criticism (defend your answer)?  Explain what a hypothetical imperative is. Explain what a categorical imperative is. Why does Kant think that morality must consist of categorical imperatives?  What does universalizability mean to Kant? What role does universalizability play in Kant’s ethical theory? Give examples. Do you think universalizability is important (defend your answer)?  What are the two versions of Kant’s categorical imperative discussed in your text? How does a categorical imperative differ from a hypothetical imperative? Give some examples of how Kant would show that the categorical imperative provides ethical guidance in concrete circumstances.  What does Kant mean by the “good will”? Why is it so important to his ethical theory? Why does he think that neither consequences nor inclinations should play a role in ethics? Do you agree with Kant (defend your answer)?  Which of the following two people—Cold Colleen or Heartfelt Heather (see lecture slides)—best illustrates what it means to be a genuinely moral person (defend your answer with reasons)? What does Kant believe? Why?  What does being an absolutist mean in ethics? Identify ways in which Kant is an absolutist? Do you agree or disagree with absolutism (defend your answer)?  What criticisms does virtue ethics make of utilitarianism and Kantian ethics? Do you agree with these criticisms (defend your answer)?                                                     Show more

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Paper Types:

COVER PAGE & BLIND REVIEW

FORMATTING STYLE:

Sources:

RESOURCES:

Example of OPTIONAL Procedure & Outline (for Dualism or/versus Physicalism)

Step 1: Read the relevant lecture slides (activate your memory regarding this stuff)

Step 2: Read the Outline (so you know what to look for in the textbook)

  • Introduction [work on this last]
  • Background/Context
  • Dualism
  • Optional: Physicalism
  • Optional: Your Assessment
  • Conclusion [work on this 2nd to last]

Step 3: Textbook, read “3.1: Overview: The Mind-Body Problem”

As you read: (1) highlight with the outline in mind, and (2) jot notes in the outline (i.e., start filling in the outline; don’t worry about writing style or anything like that yet). You can either (A) while reading: do 1, and then, while re-reading: do 2 (this will take longer, but will help you really master the material), or (B) while reading: do 1 and 2. I’d recommend doing A for 3.1, and if you really get the hang of this, maybe you can do B when doing the other reading. 

Note: 3.1 mentions dualism and physicalism; while it’s nowhere near enough information, it’s a good example of each view’s central claim/thesis.

Step 4: Regarding 3.1, organize what you jotted down in the outline. Look for stuff you need that you missed. Cut out stuff you don’t need.

Step 5: Textbook: Read “3.2: Dualism” and do the same as in Step 3. 

Regarding the separate arguments for Dualism, read all of them, but keep in mind that you may only need one of them (focus on the one you most understand)—you may want to do (1) (from Step 3) for all of the arguments, and then (2) only for argument(s) you choose to include. 

Step 6: Regarding “3.2: Dualism,” same as Step 4.

Step 7: Check how long the paper looks like it will be at this point. 

If you need more content, decide whether you want to either (A) add more arguments for/against dualism, or (B) add physicalism (using “3.3: Physicalism” skipping 234-240 on eliminativism, etc.). While doing A is less reading, the content will start getting harder (e.g., you are now focusing on arguments that weren’t the ones you best understood). Follow the procedures above in Step 3 and Step 4 for A or B. Check how long the paper looks like it will be at this point. If you need more content, do the A or B you didn’t do and/or do more arguments for and against physicalism (following the procedures in Step 3 and Step 4).

Step 8: Consider whether you have anything interesting to say about the views, which view is better (if you did both), and/or ideas about your own view.

Step 9: Write Conclusion

Step 10: Write Introduction

Step 11: Proofread and make revisions

Essay Prompts (from option 2):

Ethics

  • Explain the divine command theory. Does divine command theory make philosophical ethics obsolete? Why (not)?
  • Explain the Euthyphro Problem.
  • Explain the ethical theory of utilitarianism. How did the utilitarianism of Jeremy Bentham and John Stuart Mill differ? Which do you think is better (defend your answer)?
  • How does Alastair Norcross argue for consequentialism in “Comparing Harms: Headaches and Human Lives”? How might someone criticize his argument? Do you agree with that criticism (defend your answer)?
  • Explain what a hypothetical imperative is. Explain what a categorical imperative is. Why does Kant think that morality must consist of categorical imperatives?
  • What does universalizability mean to Kant? What role does universalizability play in Kant’s ethical theory? Give examples. Do you think universalizability is important (defend your answer)?
  • What are the two versions of Kant’s categorical imperative discussed in your text? How does a categorical imperative differ from a hypothetical imperative? Give some examples of how Kant would show that the categorical imperative provides ethical guidance in concrete circumstances.
  • What does Kant mean by the “good will”? Why is it so important to his ethical theory? Why does he think that neither consequences nor inclinations should play a role in ethics? Do you agree with Kant (defend your answer)?
  • Which of the following two people—Cold Colleen or Heartfelt Heather (see lecture slides)—best illustrates what it means to be a genuinely moral person (defend your answer with reasons)? What does Kant believe? Why?
  • What does being an absolutist mean in ethics? Identify ways in which Kant is an absolutist? Do you agree or disagree with absolutism (defend your answer)?
  • What criticisms does virtue ethics make of utilitarianism and Kantian ethics? Do you agree with these criticisms (defend your answer)?

How does the attached lesson connect to ISTE Standard Five, which says—Students break problems into component parts, extract key information, and develop descriptive models to understand complex sys How does the attached lesson connect to ISTE Standard Five, which says—Students break problems into component parts, extract key information, and develop descriptive models to understand complex systems or facilitate problem-solving. How does the lesson connect to one or more of the four “pillars” (Decomposition, Pattern Matching, Abstraction, and Debugging) – focus on the computational thinking skills children are learning that provides a foundation for future learning as they progress through school. Discuss how the lesson aids in the learning experience for the child, specifically connected to the integration of the science and  non-science subject (math, literacy, social studies, and so forth). Please focus on connecting science and non-science concepts! Explain how connecting outdoor experiences makes this unplugged activity meaningful to the child.  Show more

How does the attached lesson connect to ISTE Standard Five, which says—Students break problems into component parts, extract key information, and develop descriptive models to understand complex sys                                                         How does the attached lesson connect to ISTE Standard Five, which says—Students break problems into component parts, extract key information, and develop descriptive models to understand complex systems or facilitate problem-solving.  How does the lesson connect to one or more of the four “pillars” (Decomposition, Pattern Matching, Abstraction, and Debugging) – focus on the computational thinking skills children are learning that provides a foundation for future learning as they progress through school.  Discuss how the lesson aids in the learning experience for the child, specifically connected to the integration of the science and  non-science subject (math, literacy, social studies, and so forth). Please focus on connecting science and non-science concepts!  Explain how connecting outdoor experiences makes this unplugged activity meaningful to the child.                                                     Show more

How does the attached lesson connect to ISTE Standard Five, which says—Students break problems into component parts, extract key information, and develop descriptive models to understand complex systems or facilitate problem-solving.

How does the lesson connect to one or more of the four “pillars” (Decomposition, Pattern Matching, Abstraction, and Debugging) – focus on the computational thinking skills children are learning that provides a foundation for future learning as they progress through school.

Discuss how the lesson aids in the learning experience for the child, specifically connected to the integration of the science and  non-science subject (math, literacy, social studies, and so forth). Please focus on connecting science and non-science concepts!

Explain how connecting outdoor experiences makes this unplugged activity meaningful to the child. 

[In Process] 69970 – Assessment 3 Essay (40%): Due WeekAssessment

[In Process] 69970 – Assessment 3 Essay (40%): Due WeekAssessment

Assessment 3 Essay (40%): Due Week
Assessment 3: INDIVIDUAL WRITTEN ESSAY
Due Date: Week 11
Word Count: 1700 – 2000 words
The goal of this assessment is to provide you with an opportunity to develop an in-depth understanding about the quality and effectiveness of a particular welfare system or systems set up to promote the rights of, and address disadvantages faced by a particular group. In this assessment task, you are required to focus on the same group that you focused on in assessment 2.
In this essay, you are required to:
Identify the welfare system(s) and services, relevant to your chosen group
Identify resources and supports for the specific target group that can be accessed within the relevant welfare system(s) and services.
By drawing on relevant research evidence and inquiries, evaluate the quality and effectiveness of the systems and services provided to your chosen group. Also identify and consider how sources of funding impact on quality of service delivery.
The main focus of this assessment task is on the third point -to evaluate the quality and effectiveness of the systems and services. Answering the first two dot points ''sets the scene'' for you to focus on the final point.
Use APA 7 referencing. Your written essay should include at least 10 (scholarly) journal articles or books.
Do NOT utilize sources such as www.tutor2u.com and other such web materials as these in no way constitute academic references for the purpose of your assignments. If you rely on such sources for theoretical support you will be deemed NOT to have met the requirements of the assessment.

Paula Boothe, president of the Bramble Corporation, has mandated a minimum 10% return on investment for any project undertaken by the company. Given the company’s decentralization, Paula leaves all in Paula Boothe, president of the Bramble Corporation, has mandated a minimum 10% return on investment for any project undertaken by the company. Given the company’s decentralization, Paula leaves all investment decisions to the divisional managers as long as they anticipate a minimum rate of return of at least 12%. The Energy Drinks division, under the direction of manager Martin Koch, has achieved a 14% return on investment for the past three years. This year is not expected to be different from the past three. Koch has just received a proposal to invest $1,800,000 in a new line of energy drinks that is expected to generate $312,000 in operating income. Assume that Bramble Corporation’s actual weighted-average cost of capital is 10% and its tax rate is 32%.Calculate the economic value added of the proposed new line of energy drinks. (If the economic value added is negative then enter with a negative sign preceding the number, e.g. -5,125 or parenthesis, e.g. (5,125). Round answer to 0 decimal places, e.g. 5,125.)Economic value added$enter the economic value added in dollars rounded to 0 decimal places  Show more

Paula Boothe, president of the Bramble Corporation, has mandated a minimum 10% return on investment for any project undertaken by the company. Given the company’s decentralization, Paula leaves all in                                                         Paula Boothe, president of the Bramble Corporation, has mandated a minimum 10% return on investment for any project undertaken by the company. Given the company’s decentralization, Paula leaves all investment decisions to the divisional managers as long as they anticipate a minimum rate of return of at least 12%. The Energy Drinks division, under the direction of manager Martin Koch, has achieved a 14% return on investment for the past three years. This year is not expected to be different from the past three. Koch has just received a proposal to invest $1,800,000 in a new line of energy drinks that is expected to generate $312,000 in operating income. Assume that Bramble Corporation’s actual weighted-average cost of capital is 10% and its tax rate is 32%.Calculate the economic value added of the proposed new line of energy drinks. (If the economic value added is negative then enter with a negative sign preceding the number, e.g. -5,125 or parenthesis, e.g. (5,125). Round answer to 0 decimal places, e.g. 5,125.)Economic value added$enter the economic value added in dollars rounded to 0 decimal places                                                     Show more

Paula Boothe, president of the Bramble Corporation, has mandated a minimum 10% return on investment for any project undertaken by the company. Given the company’s decentralization, Paula leaves all investment decisions to the divisional managers as long as they anticipate a minimum rate of return of at least 12%. The Energy Drinks division, under the direction of manager Martin Koch, has achieved a 14% return on investment for the past three years. This year is not expected to be different from the past three. Koch has just received a proposal to invest $1,800,000 in a new line of energy drinks that is expected to generate $312,000 in operating income. Assume that Bramble Corporation’s actual weighted-average cost of capital is 10% and its tax rate is 32%.Calculate the economic value added of the proposed new line of energy drinks. (If the economic value added is negative then enter with a negative sign preceding the number, e.g. -5,125 or parenthesis, e.g. (5,125). Round answer to 0 decimal places, e.g. 5,125.)Economic value added$enter the economic value added in dollars rounded to 0 decimal places 

Do you think people engage in moral reasoning primarily in a consequentialist or deontological way? In other words, when faced with major ethical dilemmas or problems, do people consider mostly the co Do you think people engage in moral reasoning primarily in a consequentialist or deontological way? In other words, when faced with major ethical dilemmas or problems, do people consider mostly the consequences of or the intentions behind the actions? Provide an example (or several) from recent history in which very important decisions were made (e.g. when the U.S. decided to engage in a war, response to the pandemic, medical ethics, social justice issues, etc.) and discuss why you think these choices reflect either a consequentialist or deontological stance. Cite the readings we have covered on these topics. If you have examples that suggest an alternative moral theory is at play, defend that interpretation. Either way, be sure to discuss potential problems with assuming a singular moral theory will suffice to solve all ethical dilemmas. Essay should be at least 3 pages typed, double-space, 12-point font, and include an introduction with thesis statement, supporting paragraphs with detailed exegesis (critical exposition) of the problem, and your reasoning to support your thesis. Show more

Do you think people engage in moral reasoning primarily in a consequentialist or deontological way? In other words, when faced with major ethical dilemmas or problems, do people consider mostly the co                                                         Do you think people engage in moral reasoning primarily in a consequentialist or deontological way? In other words, when faced with major ethical dilemmas or problems, do people consider mostly the consequences of or the intentions behind the actions? Provide an example (or several) from recent history in which very important decisions were made (e.g. when the U.S. decided to engage in a war, response to the pandemic, medical ethics, social justice issues, etc.) and discuss why you think these choices reflect either a consequentialist or deontological stance. Cite the readings we have covered on these topics. If you have examples that suggest an alternative moral theory is at play, defend that interpretation. Either way, be sure to discuss potential problems with assuming a singular moral theory will suffice to solve all ethical dilemmas. Essay should be at least 3 pages typed, double-space, 12-point font, and include an introduction with thesis statement, supporting paragraphs with detailed exegesis (critical exposition) of the problem, and your reasoning to support your thesis.                                                    Show more

Do you think people engage in moral reasoning primarily in a consequentialist or deontological way? In other words, when faced with major ethical dilemmas or problems, do people consider mostly the consequences of or the intentions behind the actions? Provide an example (or several) from recent history in which very important decisions were made (e.g. when the U.S. decided to engage in a war, response to the pandemic, medical ethics, social justice issues, etc.) and discuss why you think these choices reflect either a consequentialist or deontological stance. Cite the readings we have covered on these topics. If you have examples that suggest an alternative moral theory is at play, defend that interpretation. Either way, be sure to discuss potential problems with assuming a singular moral theory will suffice to solve all ethical dilemmas. Essay should be at least 3 pages typed, double-space, 12-point font, and include an introduction with thesis statement, supporting paragraphs with detailed exegesis (critical exposition) of the problem, and your reasoning to support your thesis.

To help you manage your time, here is the first part of your final exam: This first part focuses on the 1950s and early 1960s and the passing of the torch from one generation of politicians to a you To help you manage your time, here is the first part of your final exam: This first part focuses on the 1950s and early 1960s and the passing of the torch from one generation of politicians to a younger generation. Based on your textbook readings in Chapters 27 and 28, and two documentaries (see below), you will need to consider the varying experiences and actions of presidents Dwight D. Eisenhower and John F. Kennedy. In addition to these sources, find five newspaper articles for each president (a total of 10) that help you make your case, briefly summarize these and attach them to your responses. Assigned documentaries: 1.) Dwight D. Eisenhower: Commander-In-Chief, Directed by Darryl Rehr, Narrated by Tom Selleck, Produced by Darryl Rehr, In Biography (New York, NY: A&E Television Networks, 2004) At: https://video-alexanderstreet-com.ezproxy.library.astate.edu/watch/dwight-d-eisenhower-commander-in-chief 2.) “JFK: Part Two” AMERICAN EXPERIENCE, Public Broadcasting Service, 2013 At: https://video-alexanderstreet-com.ezproxy.library.astate.edu/watch/jfk-part-two Answer the following: 1.)    What were the defining moments and greatest challenges of the presidential administrations of Eisenhower and Kennedy? 2.)    How did these presidents respond to the challenges of the Cold War and racial discrimination? Be very, very specific! 600 words (minimum). Show more

To help you manage your time, here is the first part of your final exam:   This first part focuses on the 1950s and early 1960s and the passing of the torch from one generation of politicians to a you                                                         To help you manage your time, here is the first part of your final exam:  This first part focuses on the 1950s and early 1960s and the passing of the torch from one generation of politicians to a younger generation. Based on your textbook readings in Chapters 27 and 28, and two documentaries (see below), you will need to consider the varying experiences and actions of presidents Dwight D. Eisenhower and John F. Kennedy. In addition to these sources, find five newspaper articles for each president (a total of 10) that help you make your case, briefly summarize these and attach them to your responses.  Assigned documentaries:  1.) Dwight D. Eisenhower: Commander-In-Chief, Directed by Darryl Rehr, Narrated by Tom Selleck, Produced by Darryl Rehr, In Biography (New York, NY: A&E Television Networks, 2004)  At: https://video-alexanderstreet-com.ezproxy.library.astate.edu/watch/dwight-d-eisenhower-commander-in-chief  2.) “JFK: Part Two” AMERICAN EXPERIENCE, Public Broadcasting Service, 2013  At: https://video-alexanderstreet-com.ezproxy.library.astate.edu/watch/jfk-part-two  Answer the following:  1.)    What were the defining moments and greatest challenges of the presidential administrations of Eisenhower and Kennedy?  2.)    How did these presidents respond to the challenges of the Cold War and racial discrimination? Be very, very specific!  600 words (minimum).                                                    Show more

To help you manage your time, here is the first part of your final exam:

This first part focuses on the 1950s and early 1960s and the passing of the torch from one generation of politicians to a younger generation. Based on your textbook readings in Chapters 27 and 28, and two documentaries (see below), you will need to consider the varying experiences and actions of presidents Dwight D. Eisenhower and John F. Kennedy. In addition to these sources, find five newspaper articles for each president (a total of 10) that help you make your case, briefly summarize these and attach them to your responses.

Assigned documentaries:

1.) Dwight D. Eisenhower: Commander-In-Chief, Directed by Darryl Rehr, Narrated by Tom Selleck, Produced by Darryl Rehr, In Biography (New York, NY: A&E Television Networks, 2004)

At: https://video-alexanderstreet-com.ezproxy.library.astate.edu/watch/dwight-d-eisenhower-commander-in-chief

2.) “JFK: Part Two” AMERICAN EXPERIENCE, Public Broadcasting Service, 2013

At: https://video-alexanderstreet-com.ezproxy.library.astate.edu/watch/jfk-part-two

Answer the following:

1.)    What were the defining moments and greatest challenges of the presidential administrations of Eisenhower and Kennedy?

2.)    How did these presidents respond to the challenges of the Cold War and racial discrimination? Be very, very specific!

600 words (minimum).

Please reread or think again of Sherman Alexie's “The Joy of Reading and Writing: Superman and Me.” (You will find the essay on the web). 2. Read Maya Angelou's “Graduation.” Write a list compa Please reread  or think again of Sherman Alexie’s “The Joy of Reading and Writing: Superman and Me.”  (You will find the essay on the web).      2. Read Maya Angelou’s “Graduation.” Write a list comparing and contrasting situations in “Graduation” and in “The Joy of Reading and Writing” as          preparation for the essay on both readings.  This formal essay is based on pairing the readings in agreement with your topic. You have to have an introduction starting with a generalization that includes both essays. You can write something like “this theme” or “this topic” or “this issue” is dealt with by Sherman Alexie in “The Joy of Reading and Writing: Superman and Me” and by Maya Angelou in “Graduation.” You find the topics below. Then connect this with the unfolding of the introduction and also connect it afterward to the first paragraph of the body of the essay. Do not forget at the end of the introduction to write your thesis statement, which guides your writing of the essay. Your main idea has to be present in the development of the essay. When you are developing your ideas in the three body paragraphs, you need in every paragraph to have a quote from each reading. Every paragraph should start with a topic sentence, which is an important idea related to your thesis statement. Everything you write about has also to be connected to your views and the views expressed in the two essays.  The names of the two authors and the titles of the articles have to appear in the introduction and also in the conclusion. Essay Assignment: Directions: Read the two questions below carefully and then choose only ONE. Write a thesis-centered essay of at least 500 words in response to the question. You may use a dictionary and any notes that can assist you. Keep in mind the model read in class about the movie Take the Lead and Professor de Vasconcelos’ class. Remember to: Develop a thesis ( main idea) that takes a clear stance or position to answer the question. Organize your thoughts. An outline or list can help you do this. Use MLA in-text citation-quotes and pages. You must use at least one cited idea from each reading. Also, use your own observations, experiences, or other sources to develop your claims. Explain how your citations and ideas are relevant to your thesis. Select ONLY ONE topic: 1. Education is a means of fulfilling one’s dreams and advancing socially and economically. Do you agree or disagree?  Take a position and support it. Please deal with both elements of the statement and with both prompts (essays). OR 2. Racial and economic inequality continues to exist in American schools, but, with intelligence, discipline, hard work, and support, students can triumph over oppression. Do you agree or disagree?  Take a position and support it.  Do not forget that you have to give examples from both essays. 3. Watch any video on the life of the Olympian swimmer, Casey Legler,  and after watching it, please respond to the video in an academic paragraph including what moved you and how you perceive her gender path to liberation.  Show more

Please reread  or think again of Sherman Alexie's “The Joy of Reading and Writing: Superman and Me.”  (You will find the essay on the web).      2. Read Maya Angelou's “Graduation.” Write a list compa                                                         Please reread  or think again of Sherman Alexie’s “The Joy of Reading and Writing: Superman and Me.”  (You will find the essay on the web).       2. Read Maya Angelou’s “Graduation.” Write a list comparing and contrasting situations in “Graduation” and in “The Joy of Reading and Writing” as          preparation for the essay on both readings.   This formal essay is based on pairing the readings in agreement with your topic. You have to have an introduction starting with a generalization that includes both essays. You can write something like “this theme” or “this topic” or “this issue” is dealt with by Sherman Alexie in “The Joy of Reading and Writing: Superman and Me” and by Maya Angelou in “Graduation.” You find the topics below.  Then connect this with the unfolding of the introduction and also connect it afterward to the first paragraph of the body of the essay. Do not forget at the end of the introduction to write your thesis statement, which guides your writing of the essay.  Your main idea has to be present in the development of the essay. When you are developing your ideas in the three body paragraphs, you need in every paragraph to have a quote from each reading.  Every paragraph should start with a topic sentence, which is an important idea related to your thesis statement. Everything you write about has also to be connected to your views and the views expressed in the two essays.   The names of the two authors and the titles of the articles have to appear in the introduction and also in the conclusion.  Essay Assignment:  Directions: Read the two questions below carefully and then choose only ONE. Write a thesis-centered essay of at least 500 words in response to the question. You may use a dictionary and any notes that can assist you.  Keep in mind the model read in class about the movie Take the Lead and Professor de Vasconcelos’ class.  Remember to: Develop a thesis ( main idea) that takes a clear stance or position to answer the question.  Organize your thoughts. An outline or list can help you do this. Use MLA in-text citation-quotes and pages.  You must use at least one cited idea from each reading. Also, use your own observations, experiences, or other sources to develop your claims. Explain how your citations and ideas are relevant to your thesis.  Select ONLY ONE topic: 1. Education is a means of fulfilling one’s dreams and advancing socially and economically. Do you agree or disagree?  Take a position and support it. Please deal with both elements of the statement and with both prompts (essays). OR 2. Racial and economic inequality continues to exist in American schools, but, with intelligence, discipline, hard work, and support, students can triumph over oppression. Do you agree or disagree?  Take a position and support it.  Do not forget that you have to give examples from both essays.  3. Watch any video on the life of the Olympian swimmer, Casey Legler,  and after watching it, please respond to the video in an academic paragraph including what moved you and how you perceive her gender path to liberation.                                                     Show more

Please reread  or think again of Sherman Alexie’s “The Joy of Reading and Writing: Superman and Me.”  (You will find the essay on the web).

     2. Read Maya Angelou’s “Graduation.” Write a list comparing and contrasting situations in “Graduation” and in “The Joy of Reading and Writing” as          preparation for the essay on both readings. 

This formal essay is based on pairing the readings in agreement with your topic. You have to have an introduction starting with a generalization that includes both essays. You can write something like “this theme” or “this topic” or “this issue” is dealt with by Sherman Alexie in “The Joy of Reading and Writing: Superman and Me” and by Maya Angelou in “Graduation.” You find the topics below.

Then connect this with the unfolding of the introduction and also connect it afterward to the first paragraph of the body of the essay. Do not forget at the end of the introduction to write your thesis statement, which guides your writing of the essay.

Your main idea has to be present in the development of the essay. When you are developing your ideas in the three body paragraphs, you need in every paragraph to have a quote from each reading.

Every paragraph should start with a topic sentence, which is an important idea related to your thesis statement. Everything you write about has also to be connected to your views and the views expressed in the two essays. 

The names of the two authors and the titles of the articles have to appear in the introduction and also in the conclusion.

Essay Assignment:

Directions: Read the two questions below carefully and then choose only ONE. Write a thesis-centered essay of at least 500 words in response to the question. You may use a dictionary and any notes that can assist you.

Keep in mind the model read in class about the movie Take the Lead and Professor de Vasconcelos’ class.

Remember to: Develop a thesis ( main idea) that takes a clear stance or position to answer the question.

Organize your thoughts. An outline or list can help you do this. Use MLA in-text citation-quotes and pages.

You must use at least one cited idea from each reading. Also, use your own observations, experiences, or other sources to develop your claims. Explain how your citations and ideas are relevant to your thesis.

Select ONLY ONE topic: 1. Education is a means of fulfilling one’s dreams and advancing socially and economically. Do you agree or disagree?  Take a position and support it. Please deal with both elements of the statement and with both prompts (essays). OR 2. Racial and economic inequality continues to exist in American schools, but, with intelligence, discipline, hard work, and support, students can triumph over oppression. Do you agree or disagree?  Take a position and support it.  Do not forget that you have to give examples from both essays.

3. Watch any video on the life of the Olympian swimmer, Casey Legler,  and after watching it, please respond to the video in an academic paragraph including what moved you and how you perceive her gender path to liberation.