Jurors may be a priori biased for or against the prosecution in a criminal trial.

Jurors may be a priori biased for or against the prosecution in a criminal trial.

Jurors may be a priori biased for or against the prosecution in a criminal trial.

Jurors may be a priori biased for or against the prosecution in a criminal trial. Each juror is questioned by both the prosecution and the defense (the voir dire process), but this may not reveal bias. Even if bias is revealed, the judge may not excuse the juror for cause because of the narrow legal de nition of bias. For a randomly selected candidate for the jury, de ne events B0, B1, and B2 as the juror being unbiased, biased against the prosecution, and biased against the defense, respectively. Also let C be the event that bias is revealed during the questioning and D be the event that the juror is eliminated for cause. Let bi P(Bi ) (i 0, 1, 2),C [ Fair Number of Peremptory Challenges in Jury Trials, J. Amer. Statist. Assoc., 1979: 747—753]

a. If a juror survives the voir dire process, what is the probability that he/she is unbiased (in terms of the bi s, c, and d )? What is the probability that he/she is biased against the prosecution? What is the probability that he/she is biased against the defense? Hint: Represent this situation using a tree diagram with three generations of branches. b. What are the probabilities requested in (a) if b0 .50, b1 .10, b2 .40 (all based on data relating to the famous trial of the Florida murderer Ted Bundy), c .85 (corresponding to the extensive questioning appropriate in a capital case), and d .7 (a moderate judge)?

Simulation studies are important in investigating various characteristics of a system or process.

Simulation studies are important in investigating various characteristics of a system or process.

Simulation studies are important in investigating various characteristics of a system or process.

Simulation studies are important in investigating various characteristics of a system or process. They are generally employed when the mathematical analysis necessary to answer important questions is too complicated to yield closed form solutions. For example, in a system where the time between successive customer arrivals has a particular pdf and the service time of any particular customer has another particular pdf, simulation can provide information about the probability that the system is empty when a customer arrives, the expected number of customers in the system, and the expected waiting time in queue. Such studies depend on being able to generate observations from a speci ed probability distribution. The rejection method gives a way of generating an observation from a pdf f(# ) when we have a way of generating an observation from g(#) and the ratio f(x)/g(x) is bounded, that is, c for some nite c. The steps are as follows:

1. Use a software package s random number generator to obtain a value u from a uniform distribution on the interval from 0 to 1. 2. Generate a value y from the distribution with pdf g(y). 3. If u f(y)/cg(y), set x y ( accept x); otherwise return to step 1. That is, the procedure is repeated until at some stage u f(y)/cg(y).

a. Argue that c  1. Hint: If c  1, then f(y)  g(y) for all y; why is this bad? b. Show that this procedure does result in an observation from the pdf f(); that is, P(accepted value x) F(x). Hint: This probability is P({U f(Y)/cg(Y)} {Y x}); to calculate, rst integrate with respect to u for xed y and then integrate with respect to y. c. Show that the probability of accepting at any particular stage is 1/c. What does this imply about the expected number of stages necessary to obtain an acceptable value? What kind of value of c is desirable? d. Let f(x) 20x(1


x) 3 for 0  x 1, a particular beta distribution. Show that taking g(y) to be a uniform pdf on (0, 1) works. What is the best value of c in this situation?

Generic Measure of Relationship

Generic Measure of Relationship

A Generic Measure of Relationship Satisfaction Hendrick, Susan S Journal of Marriage and the Family; Feb 1988; 50, 1; ProQuest pg. 93
SUSAN S. HENDRICK Texas Tech University
A Generic Measure of Relationship Satisfaction
The variety of interpersonal relationships in con-temporary society necessitates the development of brief, reliable measures of satisfaction that are ap-plicable to many types of close relationships. This article describes the development of such a measure. In Study I, the 7-item Relationship Assessment Scale (RAS) was administered to 125 subjects who reported themselves to be “in love.” Analyses revealed a unifactorial scale structure, substantial factor loadings, and moderate inter-correlations among the items. The scale correlated significantly with measures of love, sexual at-titudes, self-disclosure, commitment, and invest-ment in a relationship. In Study II, the scale was administered to 57 couples in ongoing relation-ships. Analyses supported a single factor, alpha reliability of .86, and correlations with relevant relationship measures. The scale correlated .80 with a longer criterion measure, the Dyadic Ad-justment Scale (Spanier, 1976), and both scales were effective (with a subsample) in discriminat-ing couples who stayed together from couples who broke up. The RAS is a brief, psycho-metrically sound, generic measure of relationship satisfaction.
The study of close interpersonal relationships has increased in recent years and with it has come the proliferation of approaches to relationship assess-ment. Such approaches include behavioral self-report, observational, and behavioral methods (Olson, 1977), but general self-report techniques
Department of Psychology, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409.
have been among the most popular. Although a number of problems with self-report research have been noted, it remains a useful research ap-proach (Harvey, Christensen, and McClintock, 1983). Relationship satisfaction is one of the major established areas of relationship assessment, with numerous measures to assess feelings, thoughts, or behaviors within the marital relationship. The most popular measures include the 15-item Locke-Wallace Marital Adjustment Test (Locke and Wallace, 1959), the 400-item Spouse Observa-tion Checklist (Patterson, 1976), the 280-item Marital Satisfaction Inventory (Snyder, 1979), and the 32-item Dyadic Adjustment Scale (Spanier, 1976). Although all of these measures are respected, several are relatively lengthy (and thus sometimes unwieldy both for research and therapy purposes), and all are oriented to marital relationships. That suggests the need for a short, general measure of relationship satisfaction. In a study of 51 married couples, the Marital Assessment Questionnaire, a 5-item measure of marital satisfaction developed by Hendrick (1981), was found to be modestly correlated (.48) with a more established measure, the Marriage Adjustment Inventory (Manson and Lerner, 1962). The Marital Assessment Questionnaire was also positively related to self-disclosure, a primary variable of interest in that study. The present research was designed to widen the focus of the Marital Assessment Questionnaire to romantic relationships in general, to explore the psychometric characteristics of the revised mea-sure, and to provide initial information on the scale’s validity and potential utility.
Journal of Marriage and the Family 50 (February 1988): 93-98 93
Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction prohibited without permission.

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HER BAL1FE W NUTRITION

HER BAL1FE W NUTRITION

f- C,, HER BAL1FE W NUTRITION
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Financial Analysis

Financial Analysis

Financial Analysis Using Spreadsheets Page 1 of 1
PRINTED BY: [email protected] Printing is for personal, private use only. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted without publisher’s prior permission. Violators will be prosecuted.
32 Case 6
The Ohio Diamonds, LLC has the following accounts receivable and collectible account estimates on. January 31, 2018.
Percent Uncollectible Accounts Receiva.ble Not yet due 2% 3 438,933.00 1-30 days past due 5% 149,614.00 31-60 days past due 15% 106,400.00 60-90 days past due 25% 57,442.00 Over 90 days past due 50% 41,402.00
In addition to the totals listed above, Ohio Diamonds, LLC has the following individual accounts receivable and due dates to include in the analysis; W. Hayes January 15, 2018 S 10,97740 C. McCoy February 15, 2018 9,314.00 J. Masterson December 20, 2017 8,664.00 K. hviog October 1, 2017 780.00 J.Thomas January 4,201a 14,810.00 C. Spielman November 15, 2017 6,316.00 S. Choo March 1, 2018 4,389.00 *Numbers/Narnes/Analys.is are fictional and for example only
On January 1, 2018 the beginning balance in Accounts Receivable was $446,341, debit, and the balance in Allowance for Uncollectible Accounts was $43,000, credit. During January the store had sales on account totaling $3,724,000, sales returns and allowances of $63,000, bad debt write-offs $44,300, and collections on account of 13,214,000. 1. See Examples that follow for format and hints. Name your three worksheets Analysis, Accounting, and Chart. 2. Prepare art aging analysis of the accounts receivable. 3. On a separate worksheet; – Record the above January transactions directly into Accounts Receivable and Allowance for UncollectIle Accounts – Prepare the journal entry to bring the allowance account up to date based on the accounts receivable aging analysis
https://j igsaw.vital source . corn/api/v0/bo oks/9781524961817/print?from=328ao=32 11/15/2018

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Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis

Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis

Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis Edition 3.2 (C++ Version)
Clifford A. Shaffer Department of Computer Science Virginia Tech Blacksburg, VA 24061
November 19, 2012 Update 3.2.0.7 For a list of changes, see http://people.cs.vt.edu/˜shaffer/Book/errata.html
Copyright © 2009-2012 by Clifford A. Shaffer. This document is made freely available in PDF form for educational and other non-commercial use. You may make copies of this file and redistribute in electronic form without charge. You may extract portions of this document provided that the front page, including the title, author, and this notice are included. Any commercial use of this document requires the written consent of the author. The author can be reached at [email protected] If you wish to have a printed version of this document, print copies are published by Dover Publications (see http://store.doverpublications.com/048648582x.html). Further information about this text is available at http://people.cs.vt.edu/˜shaffer/Book/.

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structure or contents of the caller

structure or contents of the caller

Problem 1: Create a class named NurnStackjava„ copy the content from NumStack.txt then implement the public int compareTo(NurnStacj s) method
public int compareTo(NumStack s) compares two stack from the bottom of each stack, for example,. sl[2,0, 9] and s2[9,0,9], calling sl.compareTo(s2) should return -1, s1 s2 top 9 9 3rd: 9=9 we get 0 0 0 2nd: 0 0 we get 0 bottom 2. 9 1st: 2<9 we net -1 add all and return: -1 If the two stacks have different sizes, then we consider the ith item is greater than the “none-existing item” in the smaller stack. For example, sl [8,0, -9] and s2[1], calling sl.compareTo(s2) should return 3, s1 s2 top -9 3rd: no item in sl ->1 0 2nd: no item in s2 ->1 bottom 8 1 1st: 8>1 ->1
add all and return: 3
Note: This method should not change the structure or contents of the caller and argument stack
Problem 2.: Create a class named Triangle_java implementing TriangleInterface. Include the following data members and methods:
1_ three double data members representing the three sides of a triangle (private) 2.. Constructor which takes three double numbers representing the three sides of the triangle 3_ getter methods 4_ public void setSides(double a, double b, double c) to set three sides of a triangle 5. Implements the methods specified in the interface If the three numbers can not form a valid triangle, assign 0 to all sides_ Once completed, create a plain text file named resultixt, then summarize (copy) the result from running the Grader class

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overall mutually benefiting knowledge base

overall mutually benefiting knowledge base

Once again you and your colleagues have collaborated to draw out the best in each of you to contribute to an overall mutually benefiting knowledge base of qualitative risk analysis information centered on the essential inputs, tools and techniques, and outputs necessary for performing qualitative risk analysis.  You are now required to do two things.  First, train Larry, Lucy, and the other LSDS project managers to do qualitative risk analysis.  Second, work with Larry and Lucy to complete a qualitative risk analysis for the LSDS-Jupiter Systems joint project. 
For your first requirement, prepare PowerPoint visual aids, twelve to fifteen slides, for the training you will deliver.  Since you will not be able to present live in the virtual space, use the speaker notes section of your PowerPoint visual aids to “voice”, “script”, or “record” what you would say to your audience.  Your last slide should be a References slide with APA formatted references, and you should use APA formatted citations to your references in the text of your speaker notes.
For the second requirement, you may use the PMBOK definitions of risk probability and impact in Section 7, and the probability and impact matrix in Section 8, but you must complete Section 6 Risk Categories of the PRMP, and then complete an initial qualitative risk analysis necessary for the LSDS-Jupiter Systems project.  Enter the results of your analysis for the identified threats and opportunities in the in columns 3, 4, and 5 of the Risk Register in Section 10.

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DATA COLLECTION

DATA COLLECTION

PIECE 2: DATA COLLECTION

Table of Contents

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Research Philosophy 3

Data collection methods 6

Summary of results presentation 6

Supporting appendices 9

Reference List 11

Research Philosophy

Research philosophy is a significant topic and in this context, it can be said that it is one of the most important aspects when any research study is taken into consideration. According to Cazeaux (2017), research philosophy is found to be dealing with the nature, source as well as development of knowledge. In other words, it can be said that research philosophy is referred to as a belief regarding the ways that can be implemented, which further helps in determining a phenomenon regarding the way, the data must be gathered, analysed as well as used (Business Research Methodology, 2021). The overall idea for creating knowledge might sound to be thoughtful, it is also referred to as being involved in the creation of knowledge, which is an important part of completing any research study. With respect to research philosophy, it has been stated by Kennedy (2017) that addressing the philosophy of the study in a particular study includes being conscious as well as the formulation of certain beliefs as well as assumptions. When the research onion is taken into consideration, it has been found that research philosophy is placed at the outermost layer of this research onion (Dougherty et al., 2019). Therefore, in this context, it can be said that it is one of the most important aspects of the study that helps the researcher in shaping an overall study in an effective way.

When any study is taken into consideration, it has been found that each stage of the research study is majorly based on several assumptions regarding the nature as well as sources of knowledge (Žukauskas et al., 2019). The philosophy of research is important as it majorly reflects the important assumptions. In the context of these assumptions, it can be said that these assumptions provide a base for setting a strategy for any study. In the context of research philosophy, it has been found that there are following major philosophies in a research study, which are listed as follows:

  • Positivism: In the context of positivism philosophy, it can be said that this particular philosophy seems to be difficult when it comes to explaining in a succinct as well as precise way. Abu-Alhaija (2019) has explained that there are significant differences between research settings, where this philosophy is utilised by the researcher. In the words of Blok (2018) positivism philosophy is found to be adhering to the perception that only factual knowledge that has been gained by observations are reliable. with respect to the studies that include positivism philosophy, it has been found that the researchers’ role is merely limited to the collection of data and interpreting the data objectively. In the context of such studies, the findings from such researches are generally observable as well as quantifiable (Encinas et al., 2020). It has also been stated by Schriewer (2017), this particular philosophy is majorly dependent upon the quantifiable observations that generally leads to statistical analysis. It has been further noted by Eggink and Dorrestijn (2018), positivism philosophy is in accordance with the empirical study that stems the knowledge from the experiences of humans. This form of study is found to have an ontological, atomistic perception regarding the world as comprising observable, discrete elements as well as the events that interact in a determined, observable as well as regular way.
  • Interpretivism: In regard to this philosophy, it has been found that this particular philosophy is also referred to as interpretivism, which includes the researcher interpreting the major elements present in the study. According to Qutoshi (2018), the researchers that implement this form of philosophy in the study mainly assumes that access to reality is mainly with the help of social constructions, such as consciousness, language, instruments and shared beliefs and meanings. In the context of the development of this philosophy, it can be said that the development is majorly on the basis of the positivism critique in terms of social sciences. It has been further opined by Kornberger and Mantere (2020) that this philosophy mainly focuses on qualitative analysis and not on quantitative analysis. In addition, it has also been found that this particular philosophy is majorly linked with the philosophical position of idealism and it is used for the groups in order to have a diverse approach, which includes social constructivism, phenomenology as well as hermeneutics. As per this approach, it is crucial for the researcher to act as a social actor in order to appreciate the difference present between individuals (Horne, 2021). This particular philosophy majorly focuses on the meaning and it may deploy several methodologies for reflecting several aspects of the issue.
  • Objectivism: In regard to objectivism, it can be said that it states that knowledge exists and it is waiting to be identified, therefore ignoring all the crucial roles of meaning in terms of knowledge construction (Ponce et al., 2020). In regard to this philosophy, it can be said that this particular philosophy is found to be dependent upon the idea of independence of reality from the mind of a human. It has been found that this particular philosophy is majorly based on the assumption of a specific scientific approach towards knowledge development (Vermaas and Vial, 2018). It can be segregated into two forms, direct and critical. Direct objectivism is referred to as naïve realism and it can be described as the thing that is perceived, it comes in that specific way. In other words, it has been stated by Nguyen et al. (2021) it majorly portrays the findings with the help of human senses. On the other hand, critical objectivism states that humans experience all the sensations as well as images of the real world. According to Quay et al. (2018), images, as well as sensations of the real world, can be deceptive and generally do not objectify the real scenario.
  • Pragmatism: In the context of this philosophy, it has been found that the research question plays the most important role. The researcher implementing this philosophy combines both interpretivisms as well as a positive approach within the scope of research as per the research question (Paul, 2017). In the context of this philosophy, it has been found that this particular philosophy accepts that the concepts are relevant only when they are able to support further actions. The pragmatics identify that there are several methods for interpreting the scenario and undertaking any study, and no single perception can provide a full description and there could be several realities.

With respect to this present study, the researcher has taken pragmatism into consideration. One of the most important reasons for selecting this philosophy is that this study is mainly either objective or subjective in nature. In addition, this form of philosophy will help the researcher in conducting a value as well as biased free study (Coghlan, 2017). In this regard, it can be said that it will help the researcher in providing an effective result for the study. In addition, it has also been opined by Rosiek and Gleason (2017) that this particular philosophy allows potential as well as the possibility to carry out work with respect to both, qualitative as well as quantitative data (Hassan et al., 2018). In this regard, it can be said that it further helps the researcher to identify the crucial points that help in linking the qualitative and quantitative data.

On the other hand, it has been found that the researcher has rejected positivism, interpretivism and objective philosophies. In this regard, it can be said that the main reason for rejecting these philosophies is the nature of the study and the data collected for the study. Regarding positivism, it can be said that it has been disregarded by the researcher in this study because implementing interpretivism means that the study will focus on subjective aspects of the study (Novikov and Novikov, 2019). However, in this present study, both aspects such as objective as well as subjective aspects are to be considered, hence, the researcher has not implemented interpretivism. This philosophy also has significant scope for bias, thus, to eliminate this issue, interpretivism has been disregarded. On the other hand, objectivism is also considered, as the researcher is required to focus on both qualitative and quantitative aspects of the study, therefore, this philosophy has also been rejected. Hence, on an overall basis, it can be said that the researcher has found certain loopholes in the rest of the philosophies, except Pragmatism. Therefore, pragmatism philosophy has been considered for this study.

Data collection methods

In the context of this study, the researcher has considered, the primary method for carrying out the study in an effective way. In order to carry out a primary study for the selected topic, it has been identified that the researcher has used mixed methods for conducting this primary study. In this regard, the researcher will collect data by implementing mixed methodologies, such as the quantitative method and qualitative method. In regard to the quantitative method, it can be said that this method is useful for collecting data through surveys. On the other hand, the interview is the aptest method for collecting qualitative data for this study.

Summary of results presentation

Part 1: Survey results

On the basis of the results, it has been found that five close-ended questions were asked from the respondents. The summary of the results are stated as follows:

Question 1: According to a 5-star rating perimeter, how user friendly and quick would you rate social media websites in your job-hunting process during the pandemic?

In regards to this question, it has been found that most of the participants (47.73%) have given four-star ratings in terms of experience regarding their job hunt during the pandemic. In this context, it can be said that the overall experience of the international students (job seekers) had a fairly good experience in terms of hunting for a job on social media sites. [Refer to figure 1]

Question 2: Which social media website would you rate as most productive according to your job-hunting experience?

In the context of this question, it has been found that around 52% of the participants have stated that LinkedIn is the most effective social media platform that has helped them in getting a job. In this context, it can be said that LinkedIn is the most effective platform for finding a job. [Refer to figure 2].

Question 3: How would you rate your job-hunting experience?

With respect to this question, around 47% of the respondents have stated that they had a relevantly easy procedure for hunting the job. In this regard, it can be said that searching for a job on online platforms is relatively easy and hassle-free [Refer to figure 3].

Question 4: Do you agree that the English language is a barrier for international students as part of their Job Interviews?

In the context of this question, it has been found that the around 68% of the participants have agreed to the given statement that the English language is a barrier for international students while finding jobs and as a part of their job interviews. [Refer to figure 4]

Question 5: How many jobs did you apply for online during covid-19?

With respect to this, it has been found that around 32% of the people have applied to 1 to 5 jobs during the pandemic, around 20% of the respondents have applied to 5 to 10 jobs during the pandemic, 18% have applied to 10 to 25 jobs and rest have stated that they have applied to many jobs that they lose a track. In this regard, it has been found that the respondents have applied to a lot of jobs during the pandemic period. [Refer to figure 5].

Part 2: Qualitative (Open-end discussion)

Question 1: Do you think that the number of job applications made can determine the time frame of securing a job?

On the basis of the discussion, it has been summarised that the number of job applications is not significantly helpful in determining the time frame for securing a job. In this regard, it has been identified that people can apply to several job applications and applying to the most relevant job application is helpful in gaining a job. In addition, it is also important for the candidate to pose a significant set of skills to be eligible for securing a job. Apart from this, significant experience in relevant skills would be helpful in securing a job.

Question 2: How far do you think that social media profiles of applicants have replaced the conventional CV?

In this regard, it has been summarised that social media profiles have significant replaced conventional CVs. The profiles on social media platforms distinctively tell a lot about the candidate and with appropriate tools, it helps the employer to shortlist the effective and the right set of candidates. Thus, it can be said that social media profiles have replaced the conventional CV.

Question 3: Do you think that Linked In is a virtual CV for a candidate?

In this regard, some of the participants have stated that LinkedIn is a virtual CV platform for a particular candidate. This platform is helpful for demonstrating professional skills and eventually help in demonstrating the overall profile of a candidate in a better way. However, it is important for the candidate to ensure that LinkedIn has all the correct and apt information about the candidate.

Question 4: Do you think that Job hunting experience during the pandemic was relaxed while having strong references in the relevant industry?

In this regard, it has been found that at the time of the pandemic there has been a reduction in job opportunities. Therefore, having a strong reference base in the relevant industry is very helpful for candidates looking for a job in a relevant field. It helps in promoting skills and also help in gaining a job in a particular industry. On the other hand, it is also helpful in establishing a better relationship within the industry.

Question 5: How critical do you think the Native British accent is a hurdle while taking job interviews?

With respect to this question, some of the participants have stated that native British accents act as a major limitation in securing jobs and clearing job interviews. International students have different accents than native British, which provides inclarity of speech and thus eventually hampers the job interview process of international students.

Analysis:

With respect to the response of the first respondent, it has been found that the number of job applications made helps the candidates in securing a job. In this context, the respondent states that out of 51% of the job seekers receive job offers by at least giving three job interviews. In regard to the second question, it has been found that social media profiles have massively replaced the conventional CV. It has been further stated by the respondent that the employer firstly goes through the social media profile before offering the job. It helps them in conducting a background check of the applicant. Further, the respondent also states that LinkedIn cannot take place of the conventional CV. In this context, it has been stated that the candidate can make their profile interesting by adding some additional features to their LinkedIn profile. Thus, LinkedIn cannot replace the conventional CV. During a pandemic, the organisations were not hiring, so even though having a strong reference within the relevant industry could not help the job seekers to get the job. Regarding Native British accent, there should be clarity of speech while communicating.

When the responses of the second participant are taken into consideration, it has been analysed that it is necessary for the candidate for maintaining a time frame in terms of securing a job. In the context of the conventional CVs of the candidates and its replacement with social media profiles of the candidates, the participant has responded that it is important for a candidate to have a social media profile because it makes it easier for the recruiter to see all the major credibilities and have a better image of the candidates. Regarding LinkedIn as a virtual CV for the candidate, it has been opined by this participant that LinkedIn act as a platform for demonstrating their CV for the recruiters. Having a significant reference in the relevant industry have helped the job seekers to gain jobs during the pandemic as well. Being able to communicate properly is the most crucial asset for a job seeker, and hence, having a better British accent is helpful while taking job interviews, as stated by the second participant.

With respect to the third respondent, it has been stated that the number of job applications made help the job seekers in securing a job, as getting a job is a lengthy process and needs ample time. Further, in regard to the second question, the respondent has stated that social media profiles have replaced conventional CVs in the last few years. The respondent has further stated that updating information in the LinkedIn act as a virtual CV for job seekers. Having strong references has not been helpful in securing jobs for job seekers because the pandemic has created a lot of uncertainties across the world. The participant also stated that British Accent is very different and it is mandatory for the job seekers to have a better and clear accent.

In the context of the responses given by the fourth participant, it has been found that the respondent has stated that it is mandatory for applying for a number of job applications. In this regard, the participant has further added that one never knows which job application will land up getting a job. In the context of the second question, the respondent has stated that social media have significantly replaced conventional CVs, as there is a significant shift towards social media. Additionally, the respondent has further stated that LinkedIn act as a virtual CV for the participants. Having a significant reference in the relevant industry is also helpful to get a job and it has helped many to get a job during the pandemic. In the context of the last question, the respondent stated that the native British accent is not a hurdle because knowing the language is the key and not the accent.

Supporting appendices

Figure 1: User-friendliness of social media platforms for searching jobs

(Source: Created by the researcher)

Figure 2: Most productive social media sites for searching jobs

(Source: Created by the researcher)

Figure 3: Social media job hunting experience

(Source: Created by the learner)

Figure 4: Native English language acting as a barrier for international students regarding online job advertisements

(Source: Created by the learner)

Figure 5: Application to online jobs during a pandemic

(Source: Created by the learner)

Reference List

Abu-Alhaija, A.S., 2019. From Epistemology to Structural Equation Modeling: An Essential Guide in Understanding the Principles of Research Philosophy in Selecting the Appropriate Methodology. Australian Journal of Basic and Applied Sciences13(9), pp.122-128.

Blok, V., 2018. Philosophy of innovation: A research agenda. Philosophy of Management17(1), pp.1-5.

Business Research Methodology, 2021. Research Philosophy. Available at: https://research-methodology.net/research-philosophy/ [Accessed on 12 December 2021]

Cazeaux, C., 2017. Art, research, philosophy (p. 202). Taylor & Francis.

Coghlan, D., 2017. How might we learn about the philosophy of ODC research from 24 volumes of ROCD? An invitation to interiority. In Research in organizational change and development. Emerald Publishing Limited.

Dougherty, M.R., Slevc, L.R. and Grand, J.A., 2019. Making research evaluation more transparent: Aligning research philosophy, institutional values, and reporting. Perspectives on Psychological Science14(3), pp.361-375.

Eggink, W. and Dorrestijn, S., 2018, June. Philosophy of Technology x Design: the practical turn. In Design Research Society 2018: Catalyst (pp. 190-199). Design Research Society.

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Skills Audit

Skills Audit

Skills Audit: (name)

AssignmentTutorOnline

InstructionsBreakdown each key skill into its specific components by reading the relevant chapters in the key text books or credible secondary sources, such as the University of Sunderland Study Skills or the University of Kent.

You can amend or add to the list to suit you. Utilise the key texts and credible secondary sources to do so.

You are advised to focus on 5-6 skills only

(Do not forget to delete these instructions)

Key Skill 1: Communication Rating (1-5) Evidence / Examples / Experience
Breakdown this key skill into specific components For example, listening skills, verbal communication, communicating 1-1, communicating in a team, etc. (NOTE – remove the content of this first row from your work) 1= weak; 5 = very strong Think of examples, experience and specific evidence to justify your ratingthese should be both positive & negative
Key Skill 2: Teamwork Rating (1-5) Evidence / Examples / Experience
Breakdown each key skill into specific components Think of examples, experience and evidence to justify your rating – these should be both positive & negative
Key Skill 3: Self-organisation & Time Management Rating (1-5) Evidence / Examples / Experience
Breakdown each key skill into specific components Think of examples, experience and evidence to justify your rating – these should be both positive & negative
Key Skill 4: Critical Thinking Rating (1-5) Evidence / Examples / Experience
Breakdown each key skill into specific components Think of examples, experience and evidence to justify your rating – these should be both positive & negative
Key Skill 5: Research / Finding Information Rating (1-5) Evidence / Examples / Experience
Breakdown each key skill into specific components Think of examples, experience and evidence to justify your rating – these should be both positive & negative
Key Skill 6: Problem Solving Rating (1-5) Evidence / Examples / Experience
Breakdown each key skill into specific components Think of examples, experience and evidence to justify your rating – these should be both positive & negative
Key Skill 7: IT Skills Rating (1-5) Evidence / Examples / Experience
Breakdown each key skill into specific components Think of examples, experience and evidence to justify your rating – these should be both positive & negative
Key Skill 8: Analytical Rating (1-5) Evidence / Examples / Experience
Breakdown each key skill into specific components Think of examples, experience and evidence to justify your rating – these should be both positive & negative
Key Skill 9: Essay and Report Writing Rating (1-5) Evidence / Examples / Experience
Breakdown each key skill into specific components Think of examples, experience and evidence to justify your rating – these should be both positive & negative
Key Skill 10: Presentation Skills Rating (1-5) Evidence / Examples / Experience
Breakdown each key skill into specific components Think of examples, experience and evidence to justify your rating – these should be both positive & negative
Key Skill 11: Creativity Rating (1-5) Evidence / Examples / Experience
Breakdown each key skill into specific components Think of examples, experience and evidence to justify your rating – these should be both positive & negative
Key Skill 12: Feel free to add additional skills from your reading Rating (1-5) Evidence / Examples / Experience
Breakdown each key skill into specific components Think of examples, experience and evidence to justify your rating – these should be both positive & negative